world champion – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 12:45:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-16.png world champion – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ 32 32 Charity Cup Day 1: Le, Niemann lead as Ding beats Carlsen https://tromsosjakklubb.com/charity-cup-day-1-le-niemann-lead-as-ding-beats-carlsen/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/charity-cup-day-1-le-niemann-lead-as-ding-beats-carlsen/ GM Le Quang Liem and GM Hans Niemann, underdogs for overall victory, share the lead after the first day of the Charity Cup. In what is the second leg of the Meltwater Champions Chess Tour 2022, World Champion Magnus Carlsen suffered an early loss to GM Ding Liren. The event will continue on Sunday, March […]]]>

GM Le Quang Liem and GM Hans Niemann, underdogs for overall victory, share the lead after the first day of the Charity Cup. In what is the second leg of the Meltwater Champions Chess Tour 2022, World Champion Magnus Carlsen suffered an early loss to GM Ding Liren. The event will continue on Sunday, March 20 at 9:00 a.m. PT / 6:00 p.m. CET.

Both Le and Niemann picked up three excellent wins and a draw to start the 16-man preliminaries. After four days, only half of the field will advance to the knockout stage of the tournament which has a total prize pool of $150,000. In the first four days, a win earns $750 while a draw earns both players $250.

Le’s win over GM Praggnanandhaa R. in the second round was an exciting affair as the young Indian GM lost a trade but got a pawn in return and could create two setters for White. A tricky check on move 58 would have been good for a draw:

Niemann started with a draw but went on to win three games in a row. One was a win with the black pieces over Ding, where the American grandmaster showed himself above the latest English opening theory, but the game was upside down:

Nieman said: “With the experience of the first [event], I really didn’t feel nervous at all. When I’m relaxed, good things happen.”

Ding rebounded strongly in the final round of the day when he beat Carlsen, who had previously scored two wins and a draw. The Chinese GM beat the world champion in the opener, won a trade, then returned it for a different advantage, and converted convincingly:

Ding Liren. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

The preliminaries have a 3-1-0 scoring system, where winning players get three points; shooting players, one; and the losers, zero. This leads to the next ranking after the first day.

Charity Cup | Ranking of the 1st day




















# fed name Rating Perf Points
1 Niemann, Hans Moke 2624 3034 ten
2 Le, Quang Liem 2723 2989 ten
3 Ding, Liren 2752 2906 9
4 Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi 2723 2856 8
5 Van Forest, Jordan 2714 2853 8
6 Carlsen, Magnus 2854 2803 7
7 Duda, Jan-Krzysztof 2720 2801 6
8 Praggnanandhaa, R. 2664 2669 5
9 Report, Richard 2762 2680 5
ten Hansen, Eric 2669 2644 4
11 Anton Guijarro, David 2694 2493 3
12 Navara, David 2700 2517 2
13 Ju, Wen Jun 2560 2478 2
14 Lei, Tingjie 2535 2491 2
15 Harikrishna, Pentala 2716 2577 2
16 Jones, Gawain 2672 2336 1

This second stage of the Meltwater Champions Chess Tour is dedicated to raising funds for the victims of the war in Ukraine. A few days before the start of the event, Play Magnus Group decided to use it to raise funds for UNICEF’s lifesaving support for children and their families. On the first day, over $17,000 was raised.

Another decision of Play Magnus is not to have Russian players in the event, which the world champion himself, shareholder of the company, tweeted about: “Personally, I would have liked to see all the qualified participants invited to the tournament, because it would have given the Russians a chance to take a brave stand and preserve the sporting integrity of the tournament.”

All Games Day 1

The Champions Chess Tour 2022 Charity Cup Masters runs from March 19-27 on chess24. The preliminary phase is a rapid round robin (15+10) with 16 players. The top eight players qualify for a knockout which consists of one four-game rapid match during the quarter-finals and semi-finals and two four-match rapid matches during the final. The game switches to blitz (5 + 3) and armageddon (white has five minutes, black has four with no increment) only decides if a knockout match ends in a tie. The total prize money for the event is $150,000, with $750 for each win and $250 for each draw in the preliminaries.

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Checkmate: Russia’s War on Ukraine Shatters the Chess World | Sports | German football and major international sports news | DW https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-russias-war-on-ukraine-shatters-the-chess-world-sports-german-football-and-major-international-sports-news-dw/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 14:26:15 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-russias-war-on-ukraine-shatters-the-chess-world-sports-german-football-and-major-international-sports-news-dw/ “Gens una sumus” is the Latin motto of the world chess federation, FIDE, which translates to “We are one family”. But the Russian invasion of Ukraine threatens to tear this family apart. Instead of showing their skills on the chessboard, many well-known Ukrainian chess players, like Oleksander Sulypa, are now protecting their country – with […]]]>

“Gens una sumus” is the Latin motto of the world chess federation, FIDE, which translates to “We are one family”. But the Russian invasion of Ukraine threatens to tear this family apart.

Instead of showing their skills on the chessboard, many well-known Ukrainian chess players, like Oleksander Sulypa, are now protecting their country – with a firearm if necessary.

“I defend my land against enemies and ‘peacekeepers’. The truth will win!” wrote the captain of the Ukrainian national chess team on Facebook.

His professional chess colleague, Pavel Eljanov, also does not leave his native country.

“I am with my family in relative safety in western Ukraine,” the grand master, from besieged Kharkiv, told DW.

He is trying to come to terms with the situation and supports the sanctions against Russia and Belarus announced by FIDE on Wednesday.

Individual players from the countries concerned will however still be allowed to compete under the flag of the world federation.

“The ban on team competitions is quite clear,” Eljanov said. He would find a blanket ban on individual Russian players too harsh at the moment, he added. Some of his colleagues, however, disagree.

In an open letter, 28 Ukrainian grandmasters demanded the complete exclusion of Russia from international competitions and the resignation of FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich, a native of Russia.

The conflict particularly affected the chess world because Ukraine and Russia are absolute heavyweights.

Not only do they produce exceptional individual players, but for decades they have almost always been among the top three nations in the Chess Olympiad, the most important team competition.

“The common roots of this passion for chess go back to the Soviet era,” explained DW chess expert Holger Hank. “That’s why the ties between the two countries in the field of chess are very close.”

Call from Russia: “Stop the war!”

After the outbreak of war, Russian players asked how Eljanov was doing and offered to help him. This attitude does not seem to be an isolated case. In chess, unlike other sports, there are also voices in Russia that have taken a public stand.

“We are for peace. Stop the war! read a written appeal to President Vladimir Putin signed by 34 great Russian masters including vice-world champion Ian Nepomniachtchi.

FIDE chief Dvorkovich is under pressure as he has had close ties to the Kremlin in the past. The 49-year-old was part of Russia’s political elite until 2018. The economist, considered a liberal, was Russia’s chief negotiator at G-8 meetings and deputy prime minister for six years.

“Wars are the worst things you can face in life… including this war,” he said in an interview with US internet portal Mother Jones. “Wars don’t just kill priceless lives. Wars kill hopes and aspirations, freeze or destroy relationships and connections.”

He said his thoughts are with Ukrainian civilians.

Chess chief Arkady Dvorkovich served in the Russian government until 2018

Such remarks are risky for him personally. “He could be prosecuted for this assessment,” said DW Moscow correspondent Juri Rescheto.

“He uses the word ‘war’, which under a new media law can be interpreted as discrediting the Russian armed forces and punishable by up to 15 years in prison.”

The most powerful man in the world chess federation, who is seeking re-election as FIDE president in May, is unlikely to care only about the election campaign.

Eljanov is nonetheless skeptical.

“In another interview, he made critical comments about economic sanctions against Russia, so his response is still somewhat mixed for me,” he said.

Chess expert DW Holger Hank agrees: “It’s a tightrope walk. Dvorkovich apparently wants to be re-elected president of FIDE this summer and is therefore publicly distancing himself from Putin.”

The best player Karjakin fumes against Ukraine

For Ukrainian grandmaster Eljanov, it’s not just about the Russian FIDE president. He thinks chess celebrities who support the attack on Ukraine should face permanent consequences.

It clearly refers to former world champion Anatoly Karpov, who sits as a deputy in the Russian Duma and voted for the attack on Ukraine, as well as the best player Sergey Karjakin.

Karjakin, 32, was born in Ukraine but has played for Russia since 2009. Six years ago he lost his challenge to world champion Magnus Carlsen.

On Twitter, Karjakin has campaigned against Ukraine since the start of the war, presenting it as the aggressor and mocking the victims of the war.

“He should no longer be allowed to play at international level,” demanded Eljanov.

Such cases should not obscure the fact that large parts of the chess world, including those in Russia, oppose the war and show solidarity with Ukraine. Asked about the guiding motto of FIDE, Eljanov does not hesitate for a second: “I feel it 100%”.

Since the outbreak of the war, he has received hundreds of messages and offers of help “mainly from Europe, but also from beyond”, he said. “It means a lot to me.”

This article was originally published in German.

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Our young chess geniuses and the wonderful years : The Tribune India https://tromsosjakklubb.com/our-young-chess-geniuses-and-the-wonderful-years-the-tribune-india/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 06:28:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/our-young-chess-geniuses-and-the-wonderful-years-the-tribune-india/ Viswanathan Anand OUR own R Praggnanandhaa has become the youngest player to beat Magnus Carlsen since Carlsen became world chess champion. It will give Pragg, who is only 16, a lot of confidence – “I did it once and I can do it again”, he will think. Praggnanandhaa is one of our best […]]]>


Viswanathan Anand

OUR own R Praggnanandhaa has become the youngest player to beat Magnus Carlsen since Carlsen became world chess champion. It will give Pragg, who is only 16, a lot of confidence – “I did it once and I can do it again”, he will think.

Praggnanandhaa is one of our best prospects. He is mentally strong. When he has difficult tournaments, he loses matches but he is not discouraged. He comes back, he fights. This time he beat Magnus, who had won three straight. He interrupted a very good sequence. Pragg has struggled a lot, but that’s because he’s now competing against the best in the world at the senior level. He is tested. This exposure is very good for his game.

Pragg has been one of the young players I have been working with at WestBridge Anand Chess Academy since January 2021. He, Arjun Erigaisi and D Gukesh are all under 19 and compete very fiercely against each other. I think the fact that they are peers could have a big impact on chess in India, like what happened in the former Soviet Union, where juniors propelled each other.

Working with juniors is wonderful. I try to be realistic with them. We are all human beings, we will react emotionally in most situations. So, for me, it’s about imparting to them the wisdom, rather than the strategies, which are constantly evolving in this sport. I try to share with them how I approach a problem, how I work on it, and they can incorporate things that work for them.

I try to share with them that once I too was a teenager, traveling the world. At that time, I didn’t know many people. I experienced it and it turned out to be a lot of fun. I’m trying to reassure their parents that everything will be fine, so don’t worry.

The kids recognize that I’m a multiple world champion, so at first they were surprised to see me sitting there and analyzing matches with them, but they’ve gotten used to it and are talking freely now. They are respectful children and I am over 50, so there is a bit of ‘sir’ and ‘uncle’ during the conversations!

They need to grow but they need to have experiences. Chess gives you the opportunity to meet interesting people, to travel. The important thing is to have other interests, to make friends, to have the ability to put chess aside for a few hours a day – to disconnect for a while. It is very important.

There are currently eight Indian general managers in the top 10, and the average ELO rating of the Indian top 10 is 2671, the fourth best in the world. Vidit Gujrathi is in the top 25, P Harikrishna has been in the top 15 for a while, touching No.10 at one point.

It’s true that we had a lot of promising players but they couldn’t continue. Sometimes luck matters too. Many players had to take a job early, or they had obligations. They did their best, but some may not have followed through. But many of the previous generation GMs have seeded the current generation. Many of them started their academies, became coaches.

I often tell people that yes, I had a lot of talent, I was very good – but I also had many, many breaks. My parents supported me. I was a very talented junior, but many talented juniors didn’t win the World Junior Championship, I did. I became a grandmaster and it opened doors for me. I was invited to tournaments, I had my chances and I took them.

We had a lot of good players, but the first generation after me had maybe 100-120 ELO points behind me. The younger ones will eventually reach 2700 ELO ratings. I think a lot in my academy and a few of those outside are heading in that direction. I hope to contribute to its realization.

I was the best player in India for 35 years. My time at the top will end. It will be difficult. The day it does happen will be a bit of a shock. I’ve experienced it before, when I lost my world title or the day someone passed me in the standings… You find new paths when the world passes you by! The last two years have left me a little confused as to where I am in chess because I had to take a long break. I had breaks before, but not like six months. I’ll be playing a few tournaments later this year and I’m trying to prepare for that. I have never been so inactive for so long.

I’m also at a stage where I can see it’s fun to take on new roles. I did a lot of coaching, mentoring, taking on many other assignments and commenting. You are always learning, trying new things. I will face.

As India’s first general manager, players often tell me that they were inspired by me. The baseline has changed for the new generation. They will always be compared to my results. Many of them start at a very high stage. Pragg, Nihal Sarin, Gukesh and Arjun are capable of becoming 2700 ELO players which means they will play the best tournaments. We’re just steps away from the best in the world, but I’m confident we’ll get there.

(As told to Vinayak Padmadeo)

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Ukrainian army of chess players take up arms to subdue Putin’s forces https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 06:33:28 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972. Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is […]]]>

Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972.

Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is more real. They too are facing the Russians, but not overboard.

Ukrainian chess players are resisting Vladimir Putin’s continued invasion of their country. Some have taken up arms to defend their homeland.

Grandmaster and captain of the Ukrainian national team, Oleksander Sulypa, waits behind a trench in the western city of Lviv, holding a rifle to confront the Russian army.

“I defend my land against enemies and ‘peacekeepers’. The truth will prevail!” he posted a week ago.

GM Georgy Timoshenko. Photo: Facebook/ @juliatimoshenko


A day later, another GM Georgy Timoshenko carried a rifle into battle.

“Yura (Georgy) went to defend the capital (Kiev) with guns in hand,” writes his partner Julia.

At 56, Timoshenko is probably the oldest professional chess player to enter this battlefield.

Aspiring Indian players may remember him as an unassuming grandfather coach, who ran chess camps in Odisha, Gujarat and several other Indian cities a few years ago.

GM Natalia Zhukova

GM Natalia Zhukova with Ukrainian fighters in Odessa. Photo: Facebook/ @nataliazhukova


Meanwhile, former European champion Natalia Zhukova proudly attends the city of Odessa in the southeast of the country, where she is now a member of the city council.

“From morning to evening, with like-minded people, we search for all the necessary things, medicines, etc. Zhukova wrote on Facebook.

General Manager Pavel Eljanov reported that General Manager Igor Kovalenko “actively volunteers in Kyiv and helps his brothers who have taken up arms”.

An unshaven and gloomy Kovalenko was last heard asking for help on his YouTube channel.

Eljanov, currently Ukraine’s second-best active player, posted on Facebook that his family was in Khrakiv, an eastern city closer to Russia that was ravaged by the onslaught.

He would be safe somewhere.

Teenage sensation Kirill Shevchenko, from Kyiv, is also hopefully not in danger.

He has been busy on social networks to inform the world of the tragic situation prevailing in his country.

Former world champion Anna Muzychuk has reached out to the chess community, especially her colleagues from Russia and Belarus, asking them to explain their position.

The Ukrainian Chess Federation documented the war from the perspective of its members. The other day he mentioned a war casualty.

“On March 2, 2022, after serious injuries caused by the Russian occupiers, FIDE arbiter and children’s coach Oleksiy Valentynovych Druzhynets died (Tokmak, Zaporizhia Oblast, January 3, 1975 – March 2, 2022),” the report said. federation.

Almost all but one of the Ukrainian players took the cudgel from the Russian attacks in one way or another.

The strange, Super GM Sergey Karjakin has been isolated, not only by Ukrainian players but by the peaceful international chess community as a whole.

What did you write? What do you advocate? asked a shocked Zhukova, after Karjakin rallied to Vladimir Putin.

Karjakin, a former world No. 4, wrote: “I express to you, our Commander-in-Chief, my full support in the interest of Russia, our multinational Russian people, the elimination of threats and the establishment of the peace !”

Ukraine is the country where Karjakin was born, learned to play chess and his family still lives.

After representing his native country throughout his teenage years, Karjakin, now 32, moved to Russia.

He has since become a strong supporter of Putin.

While Karjakin awaits the verdict of the FIDE Ethics Committee, Ukrainian chess players remain on the front line.

Because, as former world champion Garry Kasparov said, condemning the Russian invasion: “It’s not a game of chess. There’s no draw, no stalemate. “

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Chess: Fide cancels Moscow Olympiad as Carlsen beats Covid to reach final | Magnus Carlsen https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-fide-cancels-moscow-olympiad-as-carlsen-beats-covid-to-reach-final-magnus-carlsen/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 21:35:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-fide-cancels-moscow-olympiad-as-carlsen-beats-covid-to-reach-final-magnus-carlsen/ World chess body Fide, responding to an outpouring of criticism from players, fans and commentators, announced on Friday afternoon that its flagship team event, the biennial 150 Nations Olympiad, will would not be held in Moscow in July-August as planned and that he is looking for an alternative host city. The announcement was made on […]]]>

World chess body Fide, responding to an outpouring of criticism from players, fans and commentators, announced on Friday afternoon that its flagship team event, the biennial 150 Nations Olympiad, will would not be held in Moscow in July-August as planned and that he is looking for an alternative host city.

The announcement was made on Twitter: “The Fide Council has decided that the 44th Chess Olympiad will not take place in Russia. Fide will do everything possible to find another organizer for the Olympiad and will provide more information in due course”.

Fide follows UEFA moving the Champions League final from Saint Petersburg to Paris, the FIA ​​depriving Russia of its Formula 1 Grand Prix and the cancellation of five ski events in Russia.

Fide President Arkady Dvorkovich is a former deputy prime minister of Russia under Dmitry Medvedev, and the majority of the organization’s backers and sponsors are Russian.

While several sports organizations have severed ties with Russian sponsors, no update has yet been given on whether Fide will continue to accept funds from its own backers, which include gas supplier Gazprom, fertilizer giant PhosAgro and mining company Nornickel.

Dvorkovich is currently in Uganda on a Fide delegation with Fide Director General Dana Reizniece-Ozola, whose previous career was as Latvia’s finance minister.

On Facebook, she called events in Ukraine a “brutal incursion” and said the Ukrainian people were caught in a “vicious power game”.

The response from longtime Putin critic Garry Kasparov was quick and predictable.

“After years of warnings were ignored and heard ‘Garry, you were right!’ all fucking day today I’m going to repeat what I said in 2014: Stop telling me I was right and listen to what I’m saying now,” he wrote on Twitter.

Magnus Carlsen had a tough week at the $150,000 Online Airthings Masters, but the world champion still overcame the effects of Covid to reach the two-day final, which started at 5 p.m. Friday. Free live commentary from England’s David Howell and Jovanka Houska is available at chess24.com.

Carlsen was beaten four times in 15 games in the qualifying round and blamed the defeats on symptoms similar to brain fog: “I lacked energy, which made it hard to concentrate, and when I tried to think, I I made a mistake.” Among those who beat him were two teenagers: 19-year-old Russian Andrey Esipenko, who had already scored against Carlsen at Wijk 2021, and 16-year-old Rameshbabu Praggnanandhaa from India.

The world champion kept his balance, made sure to advance to the quarter-finals, then knocked out Vietnamese Le Quang Liem and Russian Vladislav Artemiev. By the time of Thursday’s semi-final, the No.1 had regained his normal fearsome strength, playing the first game of the game in classic attacking style.

Earlier, in the qualifying rounds, Carlsen against the Sicilian Dragonand followed a formula advocated by Bobby Fischer: open the h-file, sacrifice pieces if necessary, expose the black king, then checkmate.

Thursday coincided with the invasion of Ukraine, and aside from Carlsen, the other semi-finalists were all Russians. Ian Nepomniachtchi, crushed by the Norwegians in their world title match in Dubai two months earlier, made an impressive return to form, winning the qualifying section with rounds to spare then knocking out young contender Esipenko in the semi-finals .

Away from the board, Nepomniachtchi posted a tweet that read, “History has seen many Black Thursdays, but today is blacker than the rest.” It was signed with the hashtag #saynotowar.

3804 (by Dragoslav Djaja) 1 Nh6 !! If Kxh6 2 a8Q Rxa8 3 Rxa8 leads to K+R v K+R. If 1…Rxa7 or a3-a2 2 Rg7+! Ke6 3 Kg6+ Ke5 4 Kg5+ Ke4 5 Kg4+ Kf3 6 Kg3+ and the rook gives perpetual check on the g file.

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Airthings Masters Day 3: Nepo remains in the lead; Carlsen takes second https://tromsosjakklubb.com/airthings-masters-day-3-nepo-remains-in-the-lead-carlsen-takes-second/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 23:31:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/airthings-masters-day-3-nepo-remains-in-the-lead-carlsen-takes-second/ Managing director Ian Nepomniachtchi leads by a huge seven-point margin, while managing directors Magnus Carlsen, Vladislav Artemiev and Vincent Keymer are the main contenders for the qualifying places. How to watch? Master Airthings | Ranking of the 3rd day # fed Player Rtg Points 1 […]]]>

Managing director Ian Nepomniachtchi leads by a huge seven-point margin, while managing directors Magnus Carlsen, Vladislav Artemiev and Vincent Keymer are the main contenders for the qualifying places.

How to watch?

Master Airthings | Ranking of the 3rd day




















# fed Player Rtg Points
1 Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2773 27/36
2 Carlsen, Magnus 2865 20/36
3 Artemiev, Vladislav 2700 20/36
4 Clemer, Vincent 2664 20/36
5 Giri, Anise 2772 19/36
6 Hansen, Eric 2606 19/36
7 Abdusatorov, Nodirbek 2651 18/36
8 Esipenko, Andrei 2714 18/36
9 Ding, Liren 2799 18/36
ten Aronian, Levon 2772 17/36
11 Le, Quang Liem 2709 15/36
12 Praggnanandhaa R 2612 15/36
13 Duda, Jan-Krzysztof 2760 12/36
14 Niemann, Hans Moke 2642 11/36
15 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2767 11/36
16 Kosteniuk, Alexandra 2516 0/36

I would like to start with a disclaimer. For some reason, I didn’t feel in the mood to write my usual detailed analysis today, and instead took the position of a spectator, simply enjoying the games. This report will show some fragments from today’s games that caught my eye.

The first lap was a bit uneven. I’ll start with a special case of mutual errors in the game between GM Jan-Krzysztof Duda and GM Levon Aronian.

Nepomniachtchi could easily have added another victory to his tally by beating Keymer in a technical finale.

I praised GM Le Quang Liem’s ​​consistent play through the first two days, but he couldn’t maintain his late game composure at the start of day three. It didn’t help that his opponent was called Magnus Carlsen.

The next round brought another shocking upset. GM Eric Hansen beat the world champion with Black. Granted, Magnus blundered badly, but credit where credit is due, Eric played his opener, the classic Ruy Lopez, and never backed down.

In other important developments, I would mention the steady progress of General Manager Anish Giri. After a lackluster performance on Day One, Anish gradually picked up speed, when his third straight victory (the last over GM Ding Liren) catapulted him to a split second place. Ding, on the other hand, begins to show the ill effects of playing chess in the middle of the night. Life is hard for the Chinese number 1.

Anish Giri Airthings Masters 2022
Giri picks up the pace after their third straight win. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

The last game to end was an Artemiev victory over Aronian, which saw the Russian grab the final qualifying spot with five laps to go.

Round 11 began with a grandmaster draw between Ding and Carlsen. All things considered, we should be lenient with the players, as none of them are in a fun tournament right now. Sometimes a short breath is enough to correct the course of the ship. A big battle between Hansen and general manager Nodirbek Abdusattorov almost turned in favor of the Canadian, but Eric took too long and got into the wrong tactic.

On the handlebars of this victory, the young fast world champion found himself right in the middle. His chances got even better with a miraculous escape from bad position against Ding Liren in Round 12.

In the meantime, Artemiev continued his late push by winning a fine match against Keymer – match of the day that is.

Vlad nearly made it a perfect 4/4, but he couldn’t convert his extra pawn against GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov in Round 12. A well-rested Carlsen caught him beating Duda with surprising ease. Didn’t Bobby Fischer say the Dragon was easy: open the h file, the bag and the companion?

Carlsen and Artemiev are joined in a tie for second place by Keymer, who never seems to go away and bounces back from losses. He did it again by beating GM Hans Niemann to conclude day three.

Let’s take a look at the leaderboard and estimate the players’ chances of making the top eight.

Obviously, Nepo has already passed. His huge total of 27 points (9.5/12 and two points clear of the field under the old scoring system) will take care of that. Truth be told, with a little more care, Ian could have picked up two more wins today if he hadn’t lost a big late game advantage to Keymer and Le. Still, his speed continues to impress. Nepo literally goes through every game, spending just over five minutes of his time. Whether his confidence holds up heading into the playoffs is another story altogether.

Airthings Masters 2022 Ian Nepomniachtchi
Nepo is already in the playoffs. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Carlsen’s high-profile struggles shouldn’t make much of a difference once the playoffs begin. I feel like Magnus doesn’t really care what position he’ll be in. According to the media, the first enemy he must defeat is the Covid-19. I’m not really in a position to elaborate on medical matters, but I’m confident a 31-year-old in fine form will pull through.

I think Artemiev has already proven his class. His only two losses have come to Carlsen and Ding, and there aren’t many players left who can top him. I guess Vlad is going to be in the playoffs.

Airthings Masters 2022 Artemiav
Artemiev proved he was a force to be reckoned with. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

The rest is a big mess. I would like to see Keymer, Abdusattorov and, in particular, Hansen do it. However, experience counts in this business, and I think Giri and Aronian will be there. Not safe for Ding, however, the time zone situation is brutal. Le Quang Liem and PR are not left behind, but they are going to need a big boost. Either way, only three laps tomorrow separate us from all the answers.

All Games Day 3

The Champions Chess Tour 2022 Airthings Masters takes place February 19-27 on chess24. The preliminary phase is a rapid round robin (15+10) with 16 players. The top eight players qualify for a knockout which consists of one four-game rapid match during the quarter-finals and semi-finals and two four-match rapid matches during the final. The game switches to blitz (5 + 3) and armageddon (white has five minutes, black has four with no increment) only decides if a knockout match ends in a tie. The total prize money for the event is $150,000, with $750 for each win and $250 for each draw in the preliminaries.

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Chess prodigy Anish Giri claims he was hacked after Twitter tirade against his opponents https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-prodigy-anish-giri-claims-he-was-hacked-after-twitter-tirade-against-his-opponents/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 07:50:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-prodigy-anish-giri-claims-he-was-hacked-after-twitter-tirade-against-his-opponents/ A Dutch chess prodigy claims he was hacked on Twitter after his account attacked other grandmasters and shared vulgar DMs on Saturday night. Anish Giri, 31, had tweeted a series of accusations against fellow countryman Jorden van Foreest, world champion Magnus Carlsen, Carlsen coach Peter Heine Nielsen and Russian wonderkid Daniil Dubov. “Jorden grooms my […]]]>

A Dutch chess prodigy claims he was hacked on Twitter after his account attacked other grandmasters and shared vulgar DMs on Saturday night.

Anish Giri, 31, had tweeted a series of accusations against fellow countryman Jorden van Foreest, world champion Magnus Carlsen, Carlsen coach Peter Heine Nielsen and Russian wonderkid Daniil Dubov.

“Jorden grooms my candidates for Mangus and is now waiting for me to bring him back. @PHChess sleeps with 17 year old Thai prostitutes. Dubov is a cocaine addict. Magnus is an alcoholic who goes to strip clubs every other day. Must I expose more,” read a since-deleted tweet, according to screenshots viewed by The Post.

The account belonging to Giri, which is class the seventh-best player in the world and was awarded the title of grandmaster when he was just 14 years old, also posted a screenshot of a rude DM from former US champion Hikaru Nakamura.

“If he doesn’t take the offer, then fk ce n—a,” the purported message read.

Early Sunday morning, the blue tiles @anishgiri tweeted “Hacked.”, leading some of his followers to demand more information as Anish was trending on the social media platform.

“Screenshots are gonna need a better explanation than that,” one wrote.

“No man sorry that’s not enough. you need to clear the deal with the dms and ph accusation,” another said.

chess player, is facing backlash on social media for his posts.” class=”wp-image-21193391″ srcset=”https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/02/Anish-Giri-1.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1535 1536w, https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/02/Anish-Giri-1.jpg?quality=90&strip=all 1024w, https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/02/Anish-Giri-1.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=512 512w” sizes=”(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px”/>
Anish Giri, the world’s seventh chess player, is facing backlash on social media for his posts.
Getty Images

Others came to the defense of the chess genius, believing he was a pawn of cyberbullies.

“Remember that it’s really not that hard to fake messages. It happens all the time,” one defender said.

“Learn about computer security NOW. Reset ALL your passwords on all your accounts NOW, starting with the most secure ones. Also wouldn’t hurt to do a reinstall of the operating system on your PC. Use complex passwords,” advised another.

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Chess: Carlsen drops hard-earned ranking points in single club game in Oslo | Magnus Carlsen https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-carlsen-drops-hard-earned-ranking-points-in-single-club-game-in-oslo-magnus-carlsen/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 20:14:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-carlsen-drops-hard-earned-ranking-points-in-single-club-game-in-oslo-magnus-carlsen/ Magnus Carlsen’s vintage performance in Wijk aan Zee earned the world champion three ranking points in his quest for a world record 2900. A week later, the 31-year-old Norwegian returned them all with interest a Saturday night in Oslo at Tallaksen Ostmoe, ranked 399 points below No. 1. The very first meeting 22 years earlier […]]]>

Magnus Carlsen’s vintage performance in Wijk aan Zee earned the world champion three ranking points in his quest for a world record 2900. A week later, the 31-year-old Norwegian returned them all with interest a Saturday night in Oslo at Tallaksen Ostmoe, ranked 399 points below No. 1.

The very first meeting 22 years earlier between then-nine-year-old Carlsen, rated under 1,000, and 15-year-old Ostmoe, rated over 2,200, had also been a draw and an upset rating, but c was the reverse. tower.

Carlsen vs. Ostmoe

In Saturday night’s game, Carlsen, White in a Caro-Kann 1 e4 c6, caused an early queen trade, took a slight lead…and then missed a winning move. Can you do better?

Carlsen’s progress towards 2900 has been handicapped by his lack of opponents over 2800, meaning his rating gain after a win is small while a draw is guaranteed to drop him rating points. There has also likely been some deflation at the highest level of the ratings system since 2014, when Fide’s March ratings list showed 50 players rated 2700 and above, contrasting with just 38 players out of 2700 in the current live rankings.

It would be bizarre for the world champion to drop his 2900 target so soon after announcing it as a preferred alternative to meeting anyone of his own generation in a title match, and it looks like he will turn to the Grand Chess organized by St Louis. Filmed this spring for his next major tournament, before returning home to Stavanger in June. He will also start next Saturday, February 19, in the Airthings Masters, the first event of the year in the online Meltwater Champions Tour which Carlsen won in 2021.

Yuri Averbakh became the first-ever centenarian grandmaster on Tuesday, when the 1954 USSR champion and famous endgame writer celebrated his 100th birthday. Last week’s column marked the veteran’s achievement with an elegant Averbakh puzzle whose brief answer is worth solving if you missed it.

Averbakh has written a dozen books, but the one that stands out for aspiring players is Chess Endings: Essential Knowledge, around 120 pages and still available free online for around £10.

The American grandmasters dominated their Russian rivals in the first leg (of three) group stage of the Fide Grand Prix, which qualifies its first two for the eight-man contenders in Madrid in June. Hikaru Nakamura and Levon Aronian advance to this weekend’s semi-finals, while Wesley So and Leinier Dominguez face off in a quick tie-break on Friday (2pm start). On the other hand, Alexander Grischuk, Andrey Esipenko, Vladimir Fedoseev and Daniil Dubov were all eliminated.

In Friday’s tie-breaks (best of two quick matches), Richard Rapport (Hungary) beat Radoslaw Wojtaszek (Poland) and Dominguez (USA) beat So (USA), both by 1.5 -0.5. The pairings for the Saturday and Sunday semi-finals (2 p.m. start) are Nakamura vs Rapport and Aronian vs Dominguez.

Aronian has been the standout player so far. The former Armenian not only won his group in impressive fashion with one lap to spare, but he is now neck and neck with Fabiano Caruana in the standings in a race to establish himself as the US No.

Nakamura sparked controversy when Fide President Arkady Dvorkovich picked him as his personal joker amid expectations that he would prefer 19-year-old Esipenko. called a “statement gamein response to criticism of its inclusion. White 24 b4-b5! leads to well-calculated tactics.

Nakamura’s strong showing in Berlin baffled those who called him just an online streamer who didn’t deserve his Grand Prix wildcard. The five-time United States champion believes online play is still the same game as off-board chess.

He said: “It’s good to win games and prove to people that there really is no difference. See who won most of these online tournaments. It was this guy called Magnus, and he seems to be pretty good at overboard chess too!”

Thursday’s return match between Esipenko and Nakamura was in the last round of the group stage. The Russian needed a victory with the white pieces, the American a draw to take the lead of the group. Too much tension? The game turned out to be chaotic and riddled with errors as both GMs made many mistakes until Nakamura managed to reach a drawn queen ending.

Chinese world No. 3 Ding Liten, who was considered out of the current round of world championships after his trip to Berlin was cut short by visa difficulties, may yet have another opportunity.

If Ding reaches the semi-finals or better at the second Grand Prix stop in Belgrade, then he would be eligible to fill a vacancy should he perform at the third and final stop in Berlin. A possible scenario would be if the second Chinese player, Yu Yangyi, hurts Belgrade and then gives up.

The rules seem to say that in the event of a withdrawal, Dvorkovich decides who will be the replacement. The politically savvy Dvorkovich will be well aware of the importance of maintaining friendly relations between Fide and China, and that under certain circumstances Ding might have a chance of having a direct match with Carlsen should the world champion refuse to meet the candidate nominated by Fide.

3802: 1 Bg2! Ke3 (Rxg2? 2 h4 wins) 2 h4 Rxf4 3 Bf3! Ke5 4 h5 Ke6 5 Bd5+! (stops Kf7) Ke7 6 h6 Kf8 7 Kd2! and win. The BK is kept away from g7/h8, while the WK eats the black pawns after which the BK is in zugzwang and has to move away from f8, allowing the h6 pawn to queen. Carlsen vs. Ostmoe: 1 Bb6! win. If 1…Bxb6 2 Ra8+ and 3 Rxh8. If 1…Bb8 2 Rxg7. If 1…Bd8 2 Bxd8 Rxd8 3 Rxg7, all with a hopeless ending for Black. Instead 1 Ra8+? Bb8 2 Ba7 Kb7 leads to an even pawn end.

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Shropshire chess player publishes new book https://tromsosjakklubb.com/shropshire-chess-player-publishes-new-book/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/shropshire-chess-player-publishes-new-book/ To the blackboard. Steve Wilson, who plays for the Shrewsbury-based Telepost Chess Club, has released “Welcome To My World of Chess” which includes some of his own games, puzzles and games by the great American world champion Bobby Fischer, his favorite player. Steve takes delivery of his book. “In middle school, when I was 10, […]]]>
To the blackboard.

Steve Wilson, who plays for the Shrewsbury-based Telepost Chess Club, has released “Welcome To My World of Chess” which includes some of his own games, puzzles and games by the great American world champion Bobby Fischer, his favorite player.

Steve takes delivery of his book.

“In middle school, when I was 10, I watched two boys play a game I hadn’t seen before,” he says.

In the family he had played other games like checkers, ludo, snakes and ladders and cards, but never chess.

“After watching the boys, I had a light bulb moment. I learned chess very easily and never gave it up.”

At school, Steve says he wasn’t academically attracted to any of his subjects, but adds: “I couldn’t be called a ‘duffer’ because I was the chess king. everyone wanted to beat.

“I knew that if I played chess and could play well, I was going to be taken a lot more seriously.

“It was a few years after leaving school that I joined Wolverhampton Chess Club and soon realized that I was just an average club player. the scalp from time to time.”

During his 30 years at the Wolverhampton club, he served as team captain, tournament secretary and club secretary.

Steve, left, with colleagues from Wolverhampton Chess Club after winning the Wolverhampton Summer League Division Two in 2010.

Taking early retirement from the Royal Mail in 2015, Steve and his wife, who had lived in Fallings Park, Wolverhampton, moved to a small hamlet in mid Wales which meant missing out on chess clubs – something that changed when they moved to Shrewsbury two years later.

He says his book came to fruition when he changed the way he recorded his chess games in 2019, abandoning the old traditional descriptive notation for recording moves and using modern algebraic notation which is now virtually universal.

Steve plays in Division Two of the Shropshire Chess League, where head-to-head chess action only recently resumed after a suspension due to the Covid pandemic.

To the blackboard.

Steve’s book, which also includes a chapter on key grandmasters, is available from him direct at stevew16051805@gmail.com or at www.youcaxton.co.uk and costs £8.99.

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Check out chess player Steve’s new move https://tromsosjakklubb.com/check-out-chess-player-steves-new-move/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 10:28:12 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/check-out-chess-player-steves-new-move/ To the blackboard. Steve Wilson, who plays for the Shrewsbury-based Telepost Chess Club, has released “Welcome To My World of Chess” which includes some of his own games, puzzles and games by the great American world champion Bobby Fischer, his favorite player. Steve takes delivery of his book. “In middle school, when I was 10, […]]]>
To the blackboard.

Steve Wilson, who plays for the Shrewsbury-based Telepost Chess Club, has released “Welcome To My World of Chess” which includes some of his own games, puzzles and games by the great American world champion Bobby Fischer, his favorite player.

Steve takes delivery of his book.

“In middle school, when I was 10, I watched two boys play a game I hadn’t seen before,” he says.

In the family he had played other games like checkers, ludo, snakes and ladders and cards, but never chess.

“After watching the boys, I had a light bulb moment. I learned chess very easily and never gave it up.”

At school, Steve says he wasn’t academically attracted to any of his subjects, but adds: “I couldn’t be called a ‘duffer’ because I was the chess king. everyone wanted to beat.

“I knew that if I played chess and could play well, I was going to be taken a lot more seriously.

“It was a few years after leaving school that I joined Wolverhampton Chess Club and soon realized that I was just an average club player. the scalp from time to time.”

During his 30 years at the Wolverhampton club, he served as team captain, tournament secretary and club secretary.

Steve, left, with colleagues from Wolverhampton Chess Club after winning the Wolverhampton Summer League Division Two in 2010.

Taking early retirement from the Royal Mail in 2015, Steve and his wife, who had lived in Fallings Park, Wolverhampton, moved to a small hamlet in mid Wales which meant missing out on chess clubs – something that changed when they moved to Shrewsbury two years later.

He says his book came to fruition when he changed the way he recorded his chess games in 2019, abandoning the old traditional descriptive notation for recording moves and using modern algebraic notation which is now virtually universal.

Steve plays in Division Two of the Shropshire Chess League, where head-to-head chess action only recently resumed after a suspension due to the Covid pandemic.

To the blackboard.

Steve’s book, which also includes a chapter on key grandmasters, is available from him direct at stevew16051805@gmail.com or at www.youcaxton.co.uk and costs £8.99.

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