chess tournament – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 14:03:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-16.png chess tournament – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ 32 32 Dystrophy does not discourage this chess player https://tromsosjakklubb.com/dystrophy-does-not-discourage-this-chess-player/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 14:03:32 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/dystrophy-does-not-discourage-this-chess-player/ To get around even at home, he must be on an automated wheelchair. But, KSSRA Praneeth shows a tireless spirit to make the right choices on all 64 squares despite a grim battle for survival. This 15-year-old’s passion for chess crosses all possible barriers, including mental and physical. On Sunday alone, Praneeth, a former National […]]]>

To get around even at home, he must be on an automated wheelchair. But, KSSRA Praneeth shows a tireless spirit to make the right choices on all 64 squares despite a grim battle for survival.

This 15-year-old’s passion for chess crosses all possible barriers, including mental and physical.

On Sunday alone, Praneeth, a former National Junior Disabled Chess Champion, received a special award for his “skills” in the Brilliant Trophy Open online chess tournament (3rd place in the under-15s).

“He just can’t stay away from the game. He loves to keep playing,” says his father K. Srinivasa Rao, who works at an audit firm (EY) in the city.

“Unfortunately, both sons have a genetic condition, namely DMD (Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy) which weakens the muscles that help the body move, a problem that prevents them from making the proteins they need for strong muscles. healthy,” he said.

“Despite this major handicap, Praneeth was indeed preparing for the IPCA selections scheduled for April or May. But, he is now forced to abandon this plan to seek treatment in Kolkata”, explain Mr. Srinivasa and his wife Pavani.

For his part, Praneeth says failures are what keep him going and he will continue to do his best to keep making the right moves. “Yes, it’s a huge challenge given my condition. But it’s not a deterrent,” says the fiery chess player.

Ironically, Praneeth and her brother Shourie suffer from the same health condition which makes life all the more difficult for parents who are forced to find the right balance between taking care of their children’s health and at the same time letting them carry on with it. their respective passions.

Their second son, although not a chess player, participates in various sporting events. Recently, he participated in the 2020 National BOCCIA Championship.

The fact that the two young boys are forced to ignore the very idea of ​​pursuing studies is a hard blow to digest. “We are making every effort to get Praneeth and Shourie treated. This is the biggest challenge for us,” the parents said.

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Hayden High Good Kids Are Terrific Championship Chess Players https://tromsosjakklubb.com/hayden-high-good-kids-are-terrific-championship-chess-players/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 21:42:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/hayden-high-good-kids-are-terrific-championship-chess-players/ TOPEKA (WIBW) — Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford, two freshmen at Hayden High, love chess. About four years ago the school had a very strong chess team, then it fell apart because Hayden just didn’t have enough students interested in joining the chess club. These two young men are trying to interest more students. Matthew […]]]>

TOPEKA (WIBW) — Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford, two freshmen at Hayden High, love chess. About four years ago the school had a very strong chess team, then it fell apart because Hayden just didn’t have enough students interested in joining the chess club. These two young men are trying to interest more students. Matthew has competed at very high levels and will play nationally.

Ethan started playing chess in 5th grade at Christ The King Catholic School. He hadn’t really played chess much in the past two years due to tournaments being canceled due to Covid, and no one can really play him at home! Over the past few months, Ethan (the player wearing the glasses) has been playing a lot online and was able to participate in three tournaments recently. This qualified him to go to State in Emporia, where now his rating has really improved recently after getting a few tournaments under his belt. He’s really looking forward to improving his grade even further, and our Good Kids are hoping to put together a chess team at Hayden High.

Matthew’s fatjer taught him the game when he was just a kindergartener and in first grade! Matthew started playing tournaments around 2nd and 3rd grade. He said his most exciting moment was making his best shots in the national tournament in Nashville – and placed 51st in Grade 7. One of Matthew’s proudest moments was last week when he won the Chanute Tournament and had to beat one of the best players in the state. Another proud moment took place two years ago when he was in grade 7 and he moved up to high school and won the high school tournament! The Kansas State Championship was held at Emporia this month, where he was looking forward to playing against some of the state Grandmasters.

Ethan also participated in the State Chess Tournament at Emporia State. He took 16th place out of 124 kids with 4 points. It was a tough competition, everyone he played against was ranked higher than him. There were 124 children in the K-12 section. Matthew placed 5th and Ethan placed 16th. They did fantastic. Matthew had 5 points and Ethan had 4 points. Congratulations to this week’s Good Kids and to the amazing young chess players, Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford!

Copyright 2022 WIBW. All rights reserved.

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Local Chess Club Relaunches Group, Plans Multi-State Tournament | Local News https://tromsosjakklubb.com/local-chess-club-relaunches-group-plans-multi-state-tournament-local-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/local-chess-club-relaunches-group-plans-multi-state-tournament-local-news/ SHERIDAN – A group of men sit around chessboards in the Golden Room at the Sheridan County YMCA. Regularly, the men move pawns in place and discuss everything under the sun. Over the course of a few conversations, this small group of chess enthusiasts decided to increase their impact on the community by restarting a […]]]>

SHERIDAN – A group of men sit around chessboards in the Golden Room at the Sheridan County YMCA. Regularly, the men move pawns in place and discuss everything under the sun.

Over the course of a few conversations, this small group of chess enthusiasts decided to increase their impact on the community by restarting a well-known chess group.

The youth and adult group met at the YMCA before COVID-19 hit, but disbanded due to pandemic concerns. Now the group is officially run by the Sheridan Chess Association, which is affiliated with the American Chess Federation.

“It’s a chance to get the kids involved,” said Larry Mooney.

A group of about 20 young people and adults sat around tables of four – two sets of chess each – while munching on dinner sponsored by Powder River Pizza in the Sheridan KidsLife building on Thursday night. Several students paired up with someone their own age, while younger customers paired up with long-time chess fanatics. The adults faced off and discussed strategy throughout the evening.

Before heading out for the night, Dan Casey led a group lesson on certain elements of the game, providing an educational component beyond just collecting soft skills.

The Sheridan Chess Association restarted as the Sheridan Chess Club in September 2021 and has yet to regain its pre-pandemic attendance count of approximately 150. As a non-profit organization, the club’s former founders hope to restore the love of the game and the participation of young people. to the adult.

To help build excitement, the nonprofit will host its first-ever multi-state tournament at Sheridan College on April 30 and May 1.

The Sheridan Wyoming Open Chess Tournament is a ranked event in American Chess and already includes 22 players with a capacity of up to 100 or 120 individual players.

The first place winner receives a $1,600 purse, followed by $800 for second place, $400 for third, $200 for fourth, and $100 for fifth in Division 1, which is the open division . Chess players with a rating below 1600 or not rated by US Chess will receive $400 for first place, $200 for second, $100 for third, $50 for fourth, and $25 for fifth.

Pre-registration costs $35, while day of registration costs $45. Pre-registration closes April 15.

Saturday rounds start at 9:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday rounds start at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m., or one after the other. Membership in the US Chess Foundation is required to participate in the event.

The highest-rated registrant is Alexander Fishbein, an American chess player with a FIDE Grandmaster title – International Chess Federation or World Chess Federation.

People from Missouri, Tennessee, Colorado, Idaho and South Dakota told organizers they plan to attend.

Participation is free and children will receive a pizza at each gathering. Registration is also available at the YMCA or KidsLife.

Ashleigh Snoozy joined The Sheridan Press in October 2016 as a reporter before taking on the role of editor in November 2018. She is originally from Colorado and graduated from Biola University in Los Angeles.

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Vietnam’s number two chess player enters international best bullet semi-finals https://tromsosjakklubb.com/vietnams-number-two-chess-player-enters-international-best-bullet-semi-finals/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/vietnams-number-two-chess-player-enters-international-best-bullet-semi-finals/ By Xuan Binh March 10, 2022 | 04:30 PT Tuan Minh defeated India’s Raunak Sadhwani on Thursday to advance to the semi-finals of the Bullet Chess Online Championship. Le Tuan Minh at the National Chess Championship in Hanoi, 2020. Photo by VnExpress/Xuan Binh Minh led Sadhwani 4-3 after the first 15 minutes, then scored 4.5 […]]]>

By Xuan Binh March 10, 2022 | 04:30 PT

Tuan Minh defeated India’s Raunak Sadhwani on Thursday to advance to the semi-finals of the Bullet Chess Online Championship.

Le Tuan Minh at the National Chess Championship in Hanoi, 2020. Photo by VnExpress/Xuan Binh

Minh led Sadhwani 4-3 after the first 15 minutes, then scored 4.5 more points over the next six games to lead 8.5-4.5. Overall, Minh won 10-7 to advance.

The Bullet Chess Championship was first organized by chess.com in 2019 with a prize pool of $15,000. It is considered the best chess tournament in the world. In 2022, the prize pool has grown to $100,000. The tournament takes place from February 21 to March 17, starting from the qualifications. Minh has a high Elo rating on bullet on chess.com, so he didn’t have to play the qualifiers.

The main event is a 16-man knockout draw. Four qualified players join 12 invited players to play the main event. Players who lose a match go to the losers pool and if they continue to lose they are eliminated from the event. Grand Finals consist of a maximum of two matches, where a player from the losing pool must win twice to become the champion.

A 30-minute countdown marks the duration of the match, with a break at 15 minutes with no overtime. The highest rated player starts with white in the first game of the match. Players earn 1 point for a win, 0.5 points for a draw, and 0 points for a loss. The player who scores the most points during the match wins.

Minh, 26, is the only non-grandmaster in the semis. With an Elo rating of 2,514, he needs another chess title to become one.

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Checkmate! National Chess Tournament moves to Collingwood https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-national-chess-tournament-moves-to-collingwood/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-national-chess-tournament-moves-to-collingwood/ New tournament in Collingwood on May 7 and 8; organizer hoping to attract national grandmasters Playing chess can be good for the mind, but if you’re good at it, it can also be good for the wallet. The Canadian Chess Federation will hold its first chess tournament in Collingwood on May 7-8 at the Living […]]]>

New tournament in Collingwood on May 7 and 8; organizer hoping to attract national grandmasters

Playing chess can be good for the mind, but if you’re good at it, it can also be good for the wallet.

The Canadian Chess Federation will hold its first chess tournament in Collingwood on May 7-8 at the Living Stone Resort. Brought to town by organizer and Collingwood resident Milan Somborac, this year’s event is set to become an annual tournament, bringing competitors to Collingwood from across Canada.

Somborac was born in Belgrade, Serbia. He remembers that in Belgrade, chess is to people what hockey is to Canadians.

“They erect statues to chess champions,” he said. “It’s part of the culture there.”

Somborac says he’s noticed over the years that chess culture isn’t as big in Canada, which has led him to do what he can to start a local tournament. In the past, he says he taught a chess class at Georgian College, which led to the formation of a local chess club.

“Collingwood is a very attractive community. It has a high recognition factor for a community of its size. Everyone has heard of Collingwood,” he said. “If we hold this as an annual festival, it will be another Collingwood attraction.”

The Canadian Chess Federation (CFE), founded in 1872, is a registered non-profit organization whose mandate is to promote and encourage the knowledge, study and play of chess. Celebrating 150 years in 2022, it is the national governing body for chess in Canada.

This year, Somborac invested $3,000 of its own funds as prize money for the Collingwood tournament ($1,500 for first place, $1,000 for second and $500 for third), which hopefully he, will bring forth masters and grandmasters this year and in the years to come.

He is also looking for sponsors to help fund the event over time.

“I would like to create something that will continue,” he said.

Membership in the Canadian Chess Federation is required for all participants and can be purchased upon registration.

More information on all CFC events can be viewed here.

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Ernest Levert Jr. finds a home for the Cooperative Chess Cultural Center https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ernest-levert-jr-finds-a-home-for-the-cooperative-chess-cultural-center/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 20:33:54 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ernest-levert-jr-finds-a-home-for-the-cooperative-chess-cultural-center/ November 28, 2021 was one of the best days yet for Ernest Levert Jr. Olde Towne East’s bi-weekly Chess Rallies at Upper Cup Coffee on Parsons Avenue. After meeting regularly from 3-6 p.m. on the second and fourth Sundays of every month for about six months, more than 30 people came to the event on […]]]>

November 28, 2021 was one of the best days yet for Ernest Levert Jr. Olde Towne East’s bi-weekly Chess Rallies at Upper Cup Coffee on Parsons Avenue. After meeting regularly from 3-6 p.m. on the second and fourth Sundays of every month for about six months, more than 30 people came to the event on the last Sunday in November. A chessboard topped each table in the shop.

With so many people crammed into a small space during an ongoing pandemic, Levert’s anxiety surfaced, so he stepped out into the cold to greet people in an effort to keep people from congregating inside the store. Sitting at a table on the sidewalk, Levert looked across the street and noticed a sign outside an old tattoo shop. The space was available. A place like this, right across from the Upper Cup, could not only be an overflow room for chess events; it could be a community gathering space and the future home of a chess training center.

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Checkmate! Stevenson wins inaugural State Chess Tournament, Barrington taking second place https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-stevenson-wins-inaugural-state-chess-tournament-barrington-taking-second-place/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 12:01:31 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-stevenson-wins-inaugural-state-chess-tournament-barrington-taking-second-place/ Suburban High Schools had a strong showing last weekend at the IHSA State Team Chess Tournament at the Peoria Civic Center. The Stevenson High School chess team won the IHSA State Team Chess Tournament in Peoria. – Courtesy of Ken Lewandowski In a competition that included 126 teams and more than 1,000 high school students […]]]>

Suburban High Schools had a strong showing last weekend at the IHSA State Team Chess Tournament at the Peoria Civic Center.

The Stevenson High School chess team won the IHSA State Team Chess Tournament in Peoria.
– Courtesy of Ken Lewandowski

In a competition that included 126 teams and more than 1,000 high school students from across Illinois, Stevenson High School of Lincolnshire took first place, Barrington High School second, and Evanston High School third.

Rounding out the top 10 were Neuqua Valley High School, Naperville, in fourth place; Naperville Central in fifth place; Glenbrook South, Glenview, Sixth; Fremd High School, Palatine, seventh; Niles North, Skokie, eighth; Whitney Young, Chicago, ninth; and Normal, Normal, 10th Community High School.


The Barrington High School team took second place in the state <a class=chess tournament. More than 126 teams and 1,000 high school students competed.” width=”600″ style=”max-width:100%;width:100%;” class=”lazyImg”/>

The Barrington High School team took second place in the state chess tournament. More than 126 teams and 1,000 high school students competed.
– Courtesy of Ken Lewandowski

The tournament featured eight players from each school facing each other in challenging matches.

The coaches of winning teams were a big factor in their success, according to the Illinois Chess Coaches Association.

“Thousands and thousands of Illinois chess players have benefited from the team chess format, which drives them to grow both as intellectuals and as teammates,” said Erik Czerwin , secretary of the association.

The high school chess season begins in mid-October. From the start, the top three teams – Evanston, Barrington and Stevenson – showed the chess world that they were the ones to beat.


Brain neurons fired as 126 teams and more than 1,000 high school students from across Illinois competed in the IHSA State Team Chess Tournament Feb. 11-12 at Peoria Civic Center.

Brain neurons fired as 126 teams and more than 1,000 high school students from across Illinois competed in the IHSA State Team Chess Tournament Feb. 11-12 at Peoria Civic Center.
– Courtesy of Ken Lewandowski

Stevenson, the top seed, had to play his best — and play his best — all weekend to meet the challenge.

“It was a well-contested, tense and close tournament on every level,” said Stevenson’s head chess coach Vincent Springer.

“I’m so impressed with the way our team played this year because they leaned on each other and helped our young players (who played important roles in the team) find their way to success. I can’t think of a better example of total team effort.”

Springer summed up the difficult event as a “meat grinder.”

“I’m especially proud of this team because they’ve gone above and beyond to achieve their goals since the start of the season,” said Barrington Chess Team Head Coach Jeff Doles.

It’s the third time in four seasons that Barrington has finished second.

For a full list of results, visit ihsa.org.

]]> 2022 Burlington Carl Dunn Memorial Chess Tournament https://tromsosjakklubb.com/2022-burlington-carl-dunn-memorial-chess-tournament/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 16:41:24 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/2022-burlington-carl-dunn-memorial-chess-tournament/ The February chill was no match for the spirited competition at the seventh annual Carl Dunn Memorial Chess Tournament Saturday and Sunday in Burlington. It was a quiet setting in The Loft on Jefferson, where 30 players competed in open and reserve chess contests. Competitors were mostly new to Burlington, having traveled from six area […]]]>

The February chill was no match for the spirited competition at the seventh annual Carl Dunn Memorial Chess Tournament Saturday and Sunday in Burlington.

It was a quiet setting in The Loft on Jefferson, where 30 players competed in open and reserve chess contests.

Competitors were mostly new to Burlington, having traveled from six area states to compete in the Iowa Chess Association international sanctioned event.

“It’s exciting to have all these players come out to celebrate chess,” said tournament director Eric Vigil of Iowa City.

Players traveled from Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri and were rested and ready for departure at 9:30 a.m. Saturday.

“It was a quiet weekend in February,” said Chris Nagyi of Waseca, Minnesota, explaining why he braved the windy road to Burlington for the tournament. “My goal is not to kiss. I haven’t played a ranked game in years, and this tournament fit my schedule.

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Yuri Averbakh, the oldest living grandmaster, turns 100 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/yuri-averbakh-the-oldest-living-grandmaster-turns-100/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 10:03:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/yuri-averbakh-the-oldest-living-grandmaster-turns-100/ GM Yuri Averbakh, the world’s oldest living grandmaster, is 100 years old today. After recovering from Covid last summer, he appears to be fit again and says he is still analyzing finals to keep his mind sharp. Born on February 8, 1922 in Kaluga, a town 180 km southwest of Moscow, Averbakh is today the […]]]>

GM Yuri Averbakh, the world’s oldest living grandmaster, is 100 years old today. After recovering from Covid last summer, he appears to be fit again and says he is still analyzing finals to keep his mind sharp.

Born on February 8, 1922 in Kaluga, a town 180 km southwest of Moscow, Averbakh is today the first chess grandmaster to become a centenarian. Before him, the oldest living grandmaster was GM Andor Lilienthal, who died in 2010, three days after turning 99.

On his 100th birthday, Chess.com got in touch with Averbakh and learned that he was doing well, both in health and in spirit.

“The Russian Chess Federation offered me a month’s treatment in a convalescent center after I was discharged from hospital,” he said of the period after contracting Covid, in June 2021. “I I’m fine now. Considering how far from my youth I can say I’m fine.”

Considering the remoteness of my youth, I can say that I am doing well.

Averbakh is still involved in chess, but only to a lesser extent. “Unfortunately, in the last few years my eyesight and hearing have diminished considerably, so I can’t work on the computer like before,” he told Chess.com. “Sometimes I meet with my colleagues and share with them the ideas that come to mind. Sometimes I analyze endgame positions. I understand that in the computer age, these analyzes do not have no practical value, but this activity helps keep my mind sharp.”

Yuri Averbakh in 2017. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Sometimes I analyze late game positions. I understand that in the computer age these analyzes have no practical value, but this activity helps me to keep my mind sharp.

It’s become difficult for the 100-year-old GM to keep up with top chess these days, but there’s one player he’s particularly fond of. “Unfortunately, I cannot follow recent matches for the reasons mentioned above. Among modern players, I have always had great sympathy for general manager Ian Nepomniachtchi. I was very happy when he became a candidate in the world championship. It’s a shame that he didn’t have enough stamina in the second half of the world championship game. However, I think his talent will allow him to win more victories brilliant.”

Ian Nepomniachtchi
Averbakh expects more results from Ian Nepomniachtchi. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

During his long life, Averbakh was not only a chess player and grandmaster; he was also an acclaimed coach, international arbiter, chess composer, endgame theorist, writer and chess historian. But what does he consider his greatest achievement?

“Thank you! It is true that I have devoted my whole life to chess and have been able to approve of myself in various aspects of this great game. At the moment, I feel that my greatest achievement is my latest book on the history of chess. I am glad that I managed to complete this work. I’ve been collecting material for this book all my life.”

We also asked if he might have a favorite game. “I recently calculated that I’ve played over 2,500 tournament matches in my life,” Averbakh said. “It’s very difficult to choose my favorite, but if I only have to choose one, I would choose the match against Sergey Belavenets, which I won in 1940 (if I’m not mistaken). It was my first victory against an eminent master and a friend who played an important role in my life. He was the one who instilled in my mind a taste for the endgame and an understanding of the secrets of his strategy.”

(Unfortunately, even with the help of chess historians, we have been unable to unearth the moves for this particular game, which was played on October 12, 1941, in an unfinished game. Moscow Tournament with the Nazi army only a few kilometers away. The game is not in the databases. If any of our readers can help here, let us know.)

Averbakh obviously met many people during his life. One of the most memorable for him was GM Vasily Smyslov: I met a lot of interesting people. I can probably single out Vasily Vasilyevich Smyslov, who was notable for his philosophical mind and his ability to “grab the core”. [Averbakh likely cited from Boris Pasternak’s poem here. – PD] And there was also Sergey Vsevolodovich Belavenets mentioned above, who was a great person with high moral principles. He had a premonition that he would not return from the war and this sad omen was true.”

Smyslov was notable for his philosophical mind and his ability to “grasp the heart”.

Vasily Smyslov
Vasily Smyslov. Photo: Harry Pot/Anefo, Dutch National Archives.

Averbakh has had great success as a player. In 1944 he was awarded the title of Master of Sports of the USSR and he became a Grandmaster in 1952, setting the total number of Grandmasters in the world at 35 at the time.

Averbakh is the last living participant of the famous Candidates’ Tournament of 1953 in Zurich, one of the strongest tournaments in history about which David Bronstein and Miguel Najdorf wrote books which are considered among the best in the literature of chess.

The tournament, a 15-man double round robin, was held from August 30 to October 23, 1953 and was won by Smyslov, who would challenge GM Mikhail Botvinnik for the world title the following year. Averbakh is tied for 10th place with Isaac Boleslavsky, scoring 13.5/30.

Averbakh on the board.  |  Photo: Russian Chess Federation.
Averbakh on the board. Photo: Russian Chess Federation.

A year after the Candidates, Averbakh won the Soviet championship convincingly with 14.5/19, 1.5 points ahead of GM Mark Taimanov and GM Viktor Korchnoi, with GM Tigran Petrosian, GM Efim Geller and GM Salo Flohr also in the peloton.

At the 1958 Interzonal Tournament in Portoroz, half a point short of qualifying for another Candidates Tournament. General managers Mikhail Tal, Svetozar Gligoric, Petrosian, Pal Benko, Fridrik Olafsson and Bobby Fischer qualified. In this world championship cycle, Tal would win the crown in 1960 against Botvinnik.

Averbakh became interested in chess journalism from an early age. He was a commentator at the 1954 Smyslov-Botvinnik World Championship. From 1962, at the age of 40, he left the professional playing profession and began to focus on journalism and coaching. He was editor of several chess magazines.

Yuri Averbakh in September 2017
Yuri Averbakh in September 2017. | Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Averbakh also acted as chief referee for the first Karpov-Kasparov match in 1984, and for Kasparov-Short, London, 1993 and Kasparov-Kramnik, London, 2000.

He said in a previous interview that “working hard” was the secret to his longevity. However, until the age of 87, Averbakh went swimming almost every day, which probably didn’t hurt him either.

On behalf of the chess community, Chess.com wishes Averbakh health and happiness in his incredible life.

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U Chess Club Wins 2022 Pan Am Intercollegiate Championship – The Daily Utah Chronicle https://tromsosjakklubb.com/u-chess-club-wins-2022-pan-am-intercollegiate-championship-the-daily-utah-chronicle/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 21:02:25 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/u-chess-club-wins-2022-pan-am-intercollegiate-championship-the-daily-utah-chronicle/ (Photo by Vlada Karpovich | Courtesy of Pexels) Living on turkey sandwiches and cereal for the week, the University of Utah Chess Club has had great success in Pan American Intercollegiate Championship Team Chess Tournament in January 2022. As this was the first year the chess club could take on two teams, the Pan American […]]]>

(Photo by Vlada Karpovich | Courtesy of Pexels)

Living on turkey sandwiches and cereal for the week, the University of Utah Chess Club has had great success in Pan American Intercollegiate Championship Team Chess Tournament in January 2022.

As this was the first year the chess club could take on two teams, the Pan American tournament was already of major importance. Additionally, U’s B-Team member Dhruvan Gopinath won second place Top Upset Plaque, and the A-Team came in second place in the Third Division.

In short, an upset occurs when a lower ranked player defeats a higher ranked player, thereby increasing their own ranking and proving their level of skill.

Playing against Grandmasters, as students who had never played Pan American, was a huge win for the chess team.

“It’s a really prestigious international collegiate championship,” said Conrad Morris, a member of Team A. “Our Team A tied for first and lost the tie-breaks.”

Morris said the tournament was a great team-building experience.

“The game of chess…is a battle of the mind,” he said. “It’s like this dance, this interaction of ideas, and whoever has the strongest ideas ends up winning the game.”

Gopinath described the game as maximizing his pieces’ potential while minimizing the opponent’s potential.

“Every move is absolutely essential for position and when your opponent makes a move, you have to consider every possible aspect that that move accomplishes,” Gopinath said in an email interview. “You must then react accordingly, make sure you don’t miss any traps or tricks.”

Robert Williams, the coach of the chess team, started playing chess in the seventh grade, continuing to play with his junior high and high school league.

He played on his college chess team, competing in the 1977 Pan Am in St. Louis, Missouri. This, he said, is how the goal of the Pan American tournament began.

Williams built the U chess club from the ground up, starting in 2003. While there had been other chess clubs in the past, none had lasted very long. When the Chess Club was restarted, Williams wanted to focus on intercollegiate chess competition.

“It took a few years,” he said. “But eventually we started getting students to go to Pan-American.”

He said some of the difficulties they faced were bad weather, booking rooms and COVID-19 restrictions, saying their perseverance through this was emblematic of teamwork at the club.

“Success is student safety, with students being team players and students doing their best,” he said.

According to Williams, diversity and club cohesion are necessary for the team to truly succeed.

supporters of the chess club, including those in the tournament and outside, in addition to the teamwork of the club, have made possible the success of these students.

If interested in the chess club, students can attend club meetings Thursday nights at 6 p.m. MST in the Union.

“It’s not just a game for intellectuals,” Williams said. “It’s a game for everyone.”

[email protected]

@KaileyGilbert3

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