chess federation – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 14:26:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-16.png chess federation – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ 32 32 Checkmate: Russia’s War on Ukraine Shatters the Chess World | Sports | German football and major international sports news | DW https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-russias-war-on-ukraine-shatters-the-chess-world-sports-german-football-and-major-international-sports-news-dw/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 14:26:15 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-russias-war-on-ukraine-shatters-the-chess-world-sports-german-football-and-major-international-sports-news-dw/ “Gens una sumus” is the Latin motto of the world chess federation, FIDE, which translates to “We are one family”. But the Russian invasion of Ukraine threatens to tear this family apart. Instead of showing their skills on the chessboard, many well-known Ukrainian chess players, like Oleksander Sulypa, are now protecting their country – with […]]]>

“Gens una sumus” is the Latin motto of the world chess federation, FIDE, which translates to “We are one family”. But the Russian invasion of Ukraine threatens to tear this family apart.

Instead of showing their skills on the chessboard, many well-known Ukrainian chess players, like Oleksander Sulypa, are now protecting their country – with a firearm if necessary.

“I defend my land against enemies and ‘peacekeepers’. The truth will win!” wrote the captain of the Ukrainian national chess team on Facebook.

His professional chess colleague, Pavel Eljanov, also does not leave his native country.

“I am with my family in relative safety in western Ukraine,” the grand master, from besieged Kharkiv, told DW.

He is trying to come to terms with the situation and supports the sanctions against Russia and Belarus announced by FIDE on Wednesday.

Individual players from the countries concerned will however still be allowed to compete under the flag of the world federation.

“The ban on team competitions is quite clear,” Eljanov said. He would find a blanket ban on individual Russian players too harsh at the moment, he added. Some of his colleagues, however, disagree.

In an open letter, 28 Ukrainian grandmasters demanded the complete exclusion of Russia from international competitions and the resignation of FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich, a native of Russia.

The conflict particularly affected the chess world because Ukraine and Russia are absolute heavyweights.

Not only do they produce exceptional individual players, but for decades they have almost always been among the top three nations in the Chess Olympiad, the most important team competition.

“The common roots of this passion for chess go back to the Soviet era,” explained DW chess expert Holger Hank. “That’s why the ties between the two countries in the field of chess are very close.”

Call from Russia: “Stop the war!”

After the outbreak of war, Russian players asked how Eljanov was doing and offered to help him. This attitude does not seem to be an isolated case. In chess, unlike other sports, there are also voices in Russia that have taken a public stand.

“We are for peace. Stop the war! read a written appeal to President Vladimir Putin signed by 34 great Russian masters including vice-world champion Ian Nepomniachtchi.

FIDE chief Dvorkovich is under pressure as he has had close ties to the Kremlin in the past. The 49-year-old was part of Russia’s political elite until 2018. The economist, considered a liberal, was Russia’s chief negotiator at G-8 meetings and deputy prime minister for six years.

“Wars are the worst things you can face in life… including this war,” he said in an interview with US internet portal Mother Jones. “Wars don’t just kill priceless lives. Wars kill hopes and aspirations, freeze or destroy relationships and connections.”

He said his thoughts are with Ukrainian civilians.

Chess chief Arkady Dvorkovich served in the Russian government until 2018

Such remarks are risky for him personally. “He could be prosecuted for this assessment,” said DW Moscow correspondent Juri Rescheto.

“He uses the word ‘war’, which under a new media law can be interpreted as discrediting the Russian armed forces and punishable by up to 15 years in prison.”

The most powerful man in the world chess federation, who is seeking re-election as FIDE president in May, is unlikely to care only about the election campaign.

Eljanov is nonetheless skeptical.

“In another interview, he made critical comments about economic sanctions against Russia, so his response is still somewhat mixed for me,” he said.

Chess expert DW Holger Hank agrees: “It’s a tightrope walk. Dvorkovich apparently wants to be re-elected president of FIDE this summer and is therefore publicly distancing himself from Putin.”

The best player Karjakin fumes against Ukraine

For Ukrainian grandmaster Eljanov, it’s not just about the Russian FIDE president. He thinks chess celebrities who support the attack on Ukraine should face permanent consequences.

It clearly refers to former world champion Anatoly Karpov, who sits as a deputy in the Russian Duma and voted for the attack on Ukraine, as well as the best player Sergey Karjakin.

Karjakin, 32, was born in Ukraine but has played for Russia since 2009. Six years ago he lost his challenge to world champion Magnus Carlsen.

On Twitter, Karjakin has campaigned against Ukraine since the start of the war, presenting it as the aggressor and mocking the victims of the war.

“He should no longer be allowed to play at international level,” demanded Eljanov.

Such cases should not obscure the fact that large parts of the chess world, including those in Russia, oppose the war and show solidarity with Ukraine. Asked about the guiding motto of FIDE, Eljanov does not hesitate for a second: “I feel it 100%”.

Since the outbreak of the war, he has received hundreds of messages and offers of help “mainly from Europe, but also from beyond”, he said. “It means a lot to me.”

This article was originally published in German.

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Local Chess Club Relaunches Group, Plans Multi-State Tournament | Local News https://tromsosjakklubb.com/local-chess-club-relaunches-group-plans-multi-state-tournament-local-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/local-chess-club-relaunches-group-plans-multi-state-tournament-local-news/ SHERIDAN – A group of men sit around chessboards in the Golden Room at the Sheridan County YMCA. Regularly, the men move pawns in place and discuss everything under the sun. Over the course of a few conversations, this small group of chess enthusiasts decided to increase their impact on the community by restarting a […]]]>

SHERIDAN – A group of men sit around chessboards in the Golden Room at the Sheridan County YMCA. Regularly, the men move pawns in place and discuss everything under the sun.

Over the course of a few conversations, this small group of chess enthusiasts decided to increase their impact on the community by restarting a well-known chess group.

The youth and adult group met at the YMCA before COVID-19 hit, but disbanded due to pandemic concerns. Now the group is officially run by the Sheridan Chess Association, which is affiliated with the American Chess Federation.

“It’s a chance to get the kids involved,” said Larry Mooney.

A group of about 20 young people and adults sat around tables of four – two sets of chess each – while munching on dinner sponsored by Powder River Pizza in the Sheridan KidsLife building on Thursday night. Several students paired up with someone their own age, while younger customers paired up with long-time chess fanatics. The adults faced off and discussed strategy throughout the evening.

Before heading out for the night, Dan Casey led a group lesson on certain elements of the game, providing an educational component beyond just collecting soft skills.

The Sheridan Chess Association restarted as the Sheridan Chess Club in September 2021 and has yet to regain its pre-pandemic attendance count of approximately 150. As a non-profit organization, the club’s former founders hope to restore the love of the game and the participation of young people. to the adult.

To help build excitement, the nonprofit will host its first-ever multi-state tournament at Sheridan College on April 30 and May 1.

The Sheridan Wyoming Open Chess Tournament is a ranked event in American Chess and already includes 22 players with a capacity of up to 100 or 120 individual players.

The first place winner receives a $1,600 purse, followed by $800 for second place, $400 for third, $200 for fourth, and $100 for fifth in Division 1, which is the open division . Chess players with a rating below 1600 or not rated by US Chess will receive $400 for first place, $200 for second, $100 for third, $50 for fourth, and $25 for fifth.

Pre-registration costs $35, while day of registration costs $45. Pre-registration closes April 15.

Saturday rounds start at 9:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday rounds start at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m., or one after the other. Membership in the US Chess Foundation is required to participate in the event.

The highest-rated registrant is Alexander Fishbein, an American chess player with a FIDE Grandmaster title – International Chess Federation or World Chess Federation.

People from Missouri, Tennessee, Colorado, Idaho and South Dakota told organizers they plan to attend.

Participation is free and children will receive a pizza at each gathering. Registration is also available at the YMCA or KidsLife.

Ashleigh Snoozy joined The Sheridan Press in October 2016 as a reporter before taking on the role of editor in November 2018. She is originally from Colorado and graduated from Biola University in Los Angeles.

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Ukrainian army of chess players take up arms to subdue Putin’s forces https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 06:33:28 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972. Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is […]]]>

Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972.

Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is more real. They too are facing the Russians, but not overboard.

Ukrainian chess players are resisting Vladimir Putin’s continued invasion of their country. Some have taken up arms to defend their homeland.

Grandmaster and captain of the Ukrainian national team, Oleksander Sulypa, waits behind a trench in the western city of Lviv, holding a rifle to confront the Russian army.

“I defend my land against enemies and ‘peacekeepers’. The truth will prevail!” he posted a week ago.

GM Georgy Timoshenko. Photo: Facebook/ @juliatimoshenko


A day later, another GM Georgy Timoshenko carried a rifle into battle.

“Yura (Georgy) went to defend the capital (Kiev) with guns in hand,” writes his partner Julia.

At 56, Timoshenko is probably the oldest professional chess player to enter this battlefield.

Aspiring Indian players may remember him as an unassuming grandfather coach, who ran chess camps in Odisha, Gujarat and several other Indian cities a few years ago.

GM Natalia Zhukova

GM Natalia Zhukova with Ukrainian fighters in Odessa. Photo: Facebook/ @nataliazhukova


Meanwhile, former European champion Natalia Zhukova proudly attends the city of Odessa in the southeast of the country, where she is now a member of the city council.

“From morning to evening, with like-minded people, we search for all the necessary things, medicines, etc. Zhukova wrote on Facebook.

General Manager Pavel Eljanov reported that General Manager Igor Kovalenko “actively volunteers in Kyiv and helps his brothers who have taken up arms”.

An unshaven and gloomy Kovalenko was last heard asking for help on his YouTube channel.

Eljanov, currently Ukraine’s second-best active player, posted on Facebook that his family was in Khrakiv, an eastern city closer to Russia that was ravaged by the onslaught.

He would be safe somewhere.

Teenage sensation Kirill Shevchenko, from Kyiv, is also hopefully not in danger.

He has been busy on social networks to inform the world of the tragic situation prevailing in his country.

Former world champion Anna Muzychuk has reached out to the chess community, especially her colleagues from Russia and Belarus, asking them to explain their position.

The Ukrainian Chess Federation documented the war from the perspective of its members. The other day he mentioned a war casualty.

“On March 2, 2022, after serious injuries caused by the Russian occupiers, FIDE arbiter and children’s coach Oleksiy Valentynovych Druzhynets died (Tokmak, Zaporizhia Oblast, January 3, 1975 – March 2, 2022),” the report said. federation.

Almost all but one of the Ukrainian players took the cudgel from the Russian attacks in one way or another.

The strange, Super GM Sergey Karjakin has been isolated, not only by Ukrainian players but by the peaceful international chess community as a whole.

What did you write? What do you advocate? asked a shocked Zhukova, after Karjakin rallied to Vladimir Putin.

Karjakin, a former world No. 4, wrote: “I express to you, our Commander-in-Chief, my full support in the interest of Russia, our multinational Russian people, the elimination of threats and the establishment of the peace !”

Ukraine is the country where Karjakin was born, learned to play chess and his family still lives.

After representing his native country throughout his teenage years, Karjakin, now 32, moved to Russia.

He has since become a strong supporter of Putin.

While Karjakin awaits the verdict of the FIDE Ethics Committee, Ukrainian chess players remain on the front line.

Because, as former world champion Garry Kasparov said, condemning the Russian invasion: “It’s not a game of chess. There’s no draw, no stalemate. “

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Checkmate! National Chess Tournament moves to Collingwood https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-national-chess-tournament-moves-to-collingwood/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-national-chess-tournament-moves-to-collingwood/ New tournament in Collingwood on May 7 and 8; organizer hoping to attract national grandmasters Playing chess can be good for the mind, but if you’re good at it, it can also be good for the wallet. The Canadian Chess Federation will hold its first chess tournament in Collingwood on May 7-8 at the Living […]]]>

New tournament in Collingwood on May 7 and 8; organizer hoping to attract national grandmasters

Playing chess can be good for the mind, but if you’re good at it, it can also be good for the wallet.

The Canadian Chess Federation will hold its first chess tournament in Collingwood on May 7-8 at the Living Stone Resort. Brought to town by organizer and Collingwood resident Milan Somborac, this year’s event is set to become an annual tournament, bringing competitors to Collingwood from across Canada.

Somborac was born in Belgrade, Serbia. He remembers that in Belgrade, chess is to people what hockey is to Canadians.

“They erect statues to chess champions,” he said. “It’s part of the culture there.”

Somborac says he’s noticed over the years that chess culture isn’t as big in Canada, which has led him to do what he can to start a local tournament. In the past, he says he taught a chess class at Georgian College, which led to the formation of a local chess club.

“Collingwood is a very attractive community. It has a high recognition factor for a community of its size. Everyone has heard of Collingwood,” he said. “If we hold this as an annual festival, it will be another Collingwood attraction.”

The Canadian Chess Federation (CFE), founded in 1872, is a registered non-profit organization whose mandate is to promote and encourage the knowledge, study and play of chess. Celebrating 150 years in 2022, it is the national governing body for chess in Canada.

This year, Somborac invested $3,000 of its own funds as prize money for the Collingwood tournament ($1,500 for first place, $1,000 for second and $500 for third), which hopefully he, will bring forth masters and grandmasters this year and in the years to come.

He is also looking for sponsors to help fund the event over time.

“I would like to create something that will continue,” he said.

Membership in the Canadian Chess Federation is required for all participants and can be purchased upon registration.

More information on all CFC events can be viewed here.

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The check is in the mail: March 2022 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/the-check-is-in-the-mail-march-2022/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 20:57:53 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/the-check-is-in-the-mail-march-2022/ Greetings! Hope everyone is having a wonderful 2022 so far and getting ready for spring! Our first game this month features a Larsen opening by Robert Angres and a response by Robert Irons. At the start of the midgame, black gets a space advantage and a lingering advantage. Black seems to be winning but it’s […]]]>

Greetings!

Hope everyone is having a wonderful 2022 so far and getting ready for spring!

Our first game this month features a Larsen opening by Robert Angres and a response by Robert Irons. At the start of the midgame, black gets a space advantage and a lingering advantage. Black seems to be winning but it’s not clear (at least to me) exactly how. Eventually he is able to pin down part of the white army by defending a weakness on f2, while opening up the queen wing and taking control of the b-file. A sudden shift of this attack to the queenside helps Black invade White’s uncastled king and bring the game to an abrupt end with a stunning final blow.

[pgn] [Event "2021 Walter Muir E-Quad (21W39)"] [White "Angres, Robert (1857)"] [Black "Irons, Robert (1906)"] [Result "0-1"] 1.b3 e5 2.Bb2 Nc6 3.e3 Nf6 4.Bb5 Bd6 5.Na3 Na5 6.Nc4 Nxc4 7.Bxc4 O-O 8.Nf3 Qe7 9.h4 c6 10.d4 e4 11.Nd2 Bc7 12.Be2 d5 13.c4 a5 14.a4 Bd6 15.Qc1 Bg4 16.Ba3 Bxe2 17.Bxd6 Qxd6 18.c5 Qd8 19.Kxe2 Ng4 20.g3 b6 21.Ra2 bxc5 22.Qxc5 h5 23.b4 Qf6 24.Rf1 axb4 25.Qxb4 c5 26.dxc5 Rab8 27.Qa3 Qa6+ 28.Ke1 Ne5 29.Ra1 Rb2 0-1[/pgn]

By the way

A sad note to report. Lawrence Coplin of Gainsville, Florida died on January 17, 2022. Mr. Coplin was a loyal correspondence chess player, achieving a maximum US chess postmark of 2436. Lawrence also had the distinction of playing in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006. , and the Absolute 2007 tournaments. If anyone has a game they’d like to share, please send it.

In our second match, from Collins Quad 19C10, Barry Walker uses a Dutchman from Leningrad to topple William Baumer in a fine effort from both players. At the start, both players try to see who can amass the most space on the queen side. A small slip by white allows black to win the pair of bishops. Then Black is able to pin a knight on e4 because 21.Nxe4 would fail. Then Black keeps hold of the position, gaining more and more control and removing weaknesses, while reducing firepower. White defends admirably trying to set up a draw position, but Black’s advantage is too difficult to overcome.

[pgn] [Event "2019 Collins Quad (19C10)"] [White "Baumer, William (1930)"] [Black "Walker, Barry (2227)"] [Result "0-1"] 1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Nf3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.0-0 0-0 6.b3 d6 7.Bb2 c6 8.Nbd2 Na6 9.c4 Bd7 10.e3 b5 11.Qc2 Nb4 12.Qb1 bxc4 13.bxc4 Rb8 14.a3 Nd3 15.Qxd3 Rxb2 16.Rfb1 Rxb1 17.Rxb1 Qc7 18.Qb3 c5 19.d5 Qa5 20.Qd3 Ne4 21.Rb7 Bc8 22.Rb5 Qc3 23.Bf1 Qxd3 24.Bxd3 Nc3 25.Rb3 Bf6 26.Nb1 Na2 27.Bf1 h6 28.Rb8 Ba6 29.Rxf8+ Kxf8 30.Nfd2 Nc3 31.Nxc3 Bxc3 32.Nb1 Ba5 33.f3 e6 34.e4 fxe4 35.fxe4 Bc8 36.Bd3 Ke7 37.e5 exd5 38.cxd5 dxe5 39.Bxg6 Kd6 40.Kf2 Kxd5 41.Ke3 c4 42.Be4+ Kc5 43.Bh7 c3 44.Be4 Kc4 45.Bc2 Bb7 46.h4 Bb6+ 47.Ke2 e4 48.Bd1 Kd4 0-1[/pgn]

Golden Knights 2014

The 2014 Golden Knights tournament is over. (Yes, I’m sure the tournament is over this time!) Indianapolis’ Michael Buss finished first and second. Congratulation!! This is the Buss Golden Knights’ third clear championship and fourth championship overall. One hundred and forty-eight participated in the competition in 21 preliminary sections, followed by six semi-final sections and culminating in two final sections.

Location – Name Weighted Score Price

1st – Michael Buss $39.45,592
2nd – Michael Buss $39.00 $370
3rd – Gary Adams $37.25,222
4th – Thomas Connelly 35.15 $74
5th – Gregory Cross 35.00 $74
6th – James Ellis 33.90 $74
7th – Michael Calogridis 31.25 $74
8th – Abe Wilson 26.00 $74
9th – Edward Addis 25.00 $74
10th – Robert Miehm 23.85 $74

In taking the victory, Buss was perfect in his preliminary (14N17) and semi-final (14Ns04) sections. He scored three wins and three draws in the final section (14Nf02). A perfect score (winning all 18 games) would total 46.20.

Last month I got this King’s Gambit Accepted in the mail, so I just had to include it! Here, Christopher Ward reverses the roles of Philip Krummrich. In a complicated midgame, black unleashes a hidden rook move (at least for me) on move 22 to push white to the brink of losing a piece. Two yanks later, he pushes White on it.

[pgn] [Event "2022 Golden Knights (22EN02)"] [White "Krummrich, Philip (1588)"] [Black "Ward, Christopher (1697)"] [Result "0-1"] 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.h4 g4 5.Ne5 Nf6 6.d4 d6 7.Nd3 Nxe4 8.Bxf4 Bg7 9.c3 O-O 10.Be2 c5 11.d5 g3 12.Nd2 Nf2 13.Nxf2 gxf2+ 14.Kxf2 Qf6 15.g3 Re8 16.Bb5 Bd7 17.Bxd7 Nxd7 18.Nf3 c4 19.Qc2 Ne5 20.Bxe5 Rxe5 21.Rad1 Rae8 22.Rd2 Re3 23.Qd1 Bh6 24.Rc2 Rd3 0-1 [/pgn]

American Absolute Chess 2022

The 47th edition of the US Chess Absolute tournament kicked off on March 1. The tournament is a 13-player round robin held on the International Correspondence Chess Federation (ICCF) server. The event is rated by US Chess and the ICCF.

Competing this year are:

Harry Ingersol (California) 2382
Gordon Magat (New York) 2380
Tim Corkum (WI) 2377
John Millett (CA) 2373
Keith Rodriguez (FL) 2359
David Sogin (KY) 2348
John Walton (WA) 2341
Joel Levine (New York) 2341
Johnny Owens (KY) 2339
Ferdinand Burmeister (CA) 2334
Patrick Ryan (NJ) 2328
Timothy Harris (SC) 2295
Gregory Cross (TX) 2295

The top 13 players on January’s Top 100 Correspondence Chess Players list have received invitations to compete. If a player refused their invitation, the next player on the list received an invitation until 13 players accepted. Congratulations and good skill to each of the competitors!

For our final game this month, I present to you Charles Jacobs – Robert Heisler of Walter Muir E-Quad Section 21W46. White establishes a wide center against the black queen’s Indian defence, which white allows to reduce to trade bishops to white’s square and gain a lead in development. If it seemed, to me at least, that White was slowly turning that into an expanding positional advantage. When Black slips, White pounces… first with 21.Ne2 with the intention of Nf4… well, watch the finish for yourself!

[pgn] [Event "2021 Walter Muir E-Quad (21W46)"] [White "Jacobs, Charles (2190)"] [Black "Heisler, Robert(2015)"] [Result "1-0"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Nc3 O-O 8.e4 d5 9.cxd5 Bxf1 10.Kxf1 exd5 11.e5 Ne4 12.Kg2 c5 13.Qe2 Nxc3 14.Bxc3 Qd7 15.Rad1 Nc6 16.Rhe1 Qe6 17.Ng1 Rfd8 18.Qd3 c4 19.bxc4 dxc4 20.Qf3 Rd5 21.Ne2 Qd7 22.Nf4 Rd8 23.e6 1-0 [/pgn]

Next month, more games!

Greetings,

larry


Recent Event Winners

20T03, Charlie Leach, 4.5-1.5

19C12, Bruce Weiner, 6-0

21W28, Joe Beauvais, 5-1
21W30, Linda DeChaine, 4.5-1.5
21W34, Brian Perry, 4-2
21W38, Brandon Vila, 5.5-.5
21W39, Jeffrey Reger, 5.5-.5
21W40, Christopher Ward, 5-1
21W47, Victor Huffstatler, 4.5-1-5

21VP12, Wallace Mann, 5-1
21VP13, Hank Cox, 5.5-0.5

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Yuri Averbakh, the oldest living grandmaster, turns 100 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/yuri-averbakh-the-oldest-living-grandmaster-turns-100/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 10:03:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/yuri-averbakh-the-oldest-living-grandmaster-turns-100/ GM Yuri Averbakh, the world’s oldest living grandmaster, is 100 years old today. After recovering from Covid last summer, he appears to be fit again and says he is still analyzing finals to keep his mind sharp. Born on February 8, 1922 in Kaluga, a town 180 km southwest of Moscow, Averbakh is today the […]]]>

GM Yuri Averbakh, the world’s oldest living grandmaster, is 100 years old today. After recovering from Covid last summer, he appears to be fit again and says he is still analyzing finals to keep his mind sharp.

Born on February 8, 1922 in Kaluga, a town 180 km southwest of Moscow, Averbakh is today the first chess grandmaster to become a centenarian. Before him, the oldest living grandmaster was GM Andor Lilienthal, who died in 2010, three days after turning 99.

On his 100th birthday, Chess.com got in touch with Averbakh and learned that he was doing well, both in health and in spirit.

“The Russian Chess Federation offered me a month’s treatment in a convalescent center after I was discharged from hospital,” he said of the period after contracting Covid, in June 2021. “I I’m fine now. Considering how far from my youth I can say I’m fine.”

Considering the remoteness of my youth, I can say that I am doing well.

Averbakh is still involved in chess, but only to a lesser extent. “Unfortunately, in the last few years my eyesight and hearing have diminished considerably, so I can’t work on the computer like before,” he told Chess.com. “Sometimes I meet with my colleagues and share with them the ideas that come to mind. Sometimes I analyze endgame positions. I understand that in the computer age, these analyzes do not have no practical value, but this activity helps keep my mind sharp.”

Yuri Averbakh in 2017. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Sometimes I analyze late game positions. I understand that in the computer age these analyzes have no practical value, but this activity helps me to keep my mind sharp.

It’s become difficult for the 100-year-old GM to keep up with top chess these days, but there’s one player he’s particularly fond of. “Unfortunately, I cannot follow recent matches for the reasons mentioned above. Among modern players, I have always had great sympathy for general manager Ian Nepomniachtchi. I was very happy when he became a candidate in the world championship. It’s a shame that he didn’t have enough stamina in the second half of the world championship game. However, I think his talent will allow him to win more victories brilliant.”

Ian Nepomniachtchi
Averbakh expects more results from Ian Nepomniachtchi. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

During his long life, Averbakh was not only a chess player and grandmaster; he was also an acclaimed coach, international arbiter, chess composer, endgame theorist, writer and chess historian. But what does he consider his greatest achievement?

“Thank you! It is true that I have devoted my whole life to chess and have been able to approve of myself in various aspects of this great game. At the moment, I feel that my greatest achievement is my latest book on the history of chess. I am glad that I managed to complete this work. I’ve been collecting material for this book all my life.”

We also asked if he might have a favorite game. “I recently calculated that I’ve played over 2,500 tournament matches in my life,” Averbakh said. “It’s very difficult to choose my favorite, but if I only have to choose one, I would choose the match against Sergey Belavenets, which I won in 1940 (if I’m not mistaken). It was my first victory against an eminent master and a friend who played an important role in my life. He was the one who instilled in my mind a taste for the endgame and an understanding of the secrets of his strategy.”

(Unfortunately, even with the help of chess historians, we have been unable to unearth the moves for this particular game, which was played on October 12, 1941, in an unfinished game. Moscow Tournament with the Nazi army only a few kilometers away. The game is not in the databases. If any of our readers can help here, let us know.)

Averbakh obviously met many people during his life. One of the most memorable for him was GM Vasily Smyslov: I met a lot of interesting people. I can probably single out Vasily Vasilyevich Smyslov, who was notable for his philosophical mind and his ability to “grab the core”. [Averbakh likely cited from Boris Pasternak’s poem here. – PD] And there was also Sergey Vsevolodovich Belavenets mentioned above, who was a great person with high moral principles. He had a premonition that he would not return from the war and this sad omen was true.”

Smyslov was notable for his philosophical mind and his ability to “grasp the heart”.

Vasily Smyslov
Vasily Smyslov. Photo: Harry Pot/Anefo, Dutch National Archives.

Averbakh has had great success as a player. In 1944 he was awarded the title of Master of Sports of the USSR and he became a Grandmaster in 1952, setting the total number of Grandmasters in the world at 35 at the time.

Averbakh is the last living participant of the famous Candidates’ Tournament of 1953 in Zurich, one of the strongest tournaments in history about which David Bronstein and Miguel Najdorf wrote books which are considered among the best in the literature of chess.

The tournament, a 15-man double round robin, was held from August 30 to October 23, 1953 and was won by Smyslov, who would challenge GM Mikhail Botvinnik for the world title the following year. Averbakh is tied for 10th place with Isaac Boleslavsky, scoring 13.5/30.

Averbakh on the board.  |  Photo: Russian Chess Federation.
Averbakh on the board. Photo: Russian Chess Federation.

A year after the Candidates, Averbakh won the Soviet championship convincingly with 14.5/19, 1.5 points ahead of GM Mark Taimanov and GM Viktor Korchnoi, with GM Tigran Petrosian, GM Efim Geller and GM Salo Flohr also in the peloton.

At the 1958 Interzonal Tournament in Portoroz, half a point short of qualifying for another Candidates Tournament. General managers Mikhail Tal, Svetozar Gligoric, Petrosian, Pal Benko, Fridrik Olafsson and Bobby Fischer qualified. In this world championship cycle, Tal would win the crown in 1960 against Botvinnik.

Averbakh became interested in chess journalism from an early age. He was a commentator at the 1954 Smyslov-Botvinnik World Championship. From 1962, at the age of 40, he left the professional playing profession and began to focus on journalism and coaching. He was editor of several chess magazines.

Yuri Averbakh in September 2017
Yuri Averbakh in September 2017. | Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Averbakh also acted as chief referee for the first Karpov-Kasparov match in 1984, and for Kasparov-Short, London, 1993 and Kasparov-Kramnik, London, 2000.

He said in a previous interview that “working hard” was the secret to his longevity. However, until the age of 87, Averbakh went swimming almost every day, which probably didn’t hurt him either.

On behalf of the chess community, Chess.com wishes Averbakh health and happiness in his incredible life.

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Checkmate: Chess Club Exceeds Expectations at Tournament https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-chess-club-exceeds-expectations-at-tournament/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 05:13:12 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-chess-club-exceeds-expectations-at-tournament/ Rannon Huo, 4th board of WashU’s A team, in the middle of a lap. (Photo courtesy of Bill Simmons) In the second round of the 2022 Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships, the University of Washington Chess Club A-Team faced a team of international masters, all ranked among the top 1,600 active chess players in the […]]]>

Rannon Huo, 4th board of WashU’s A team, in the middle of a lap. (Photo courtesy of Bill Simmons)

In the second round of the 2022 Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships, the University of Washington Chess Club A-Team faced a team of international masters, all ranked among the top 1,600 active chess players in the world. While WashU lost all four matches this round, they exceeded their overall expectations against such high levels of competition and left the tournament with a higher ranking than when they arrived.

The Chess Club sent two teams to participate in the tournament, which was held in Dulles, Virginia from January 6-9. Team A consisted of seniors Philip Keisler and Nicholas Bartochowski, sophomore Rannon Huo and sophomore Saumik Narayanan. The B team consisted of senior Andrew Shiman and first years Josh Warner, Ilan Schwartz and Joseph Badros.

Team A entered the tournament as the 20th seed and Team B entered as the 42nd seed. After the final round, Team B finished in 33rd place with a score of 3.0/6.0, while Team A finished in 16th place with a score of 4.0/6.0 , narrowly missing out on the medals awarded to the top 15 teams when it fell behind the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in a tiebreaker.

The annual tournament uses a six-round Swiss system, a non-elimination format where teams are ranked by number of wins and then by tiebreaker score. Each round, each college team was paired with another to play a game of chess in the classic time format. The members of the teams were each ranked according to the standards of the International Chess Federation (FIDE) and paired with the corresponding member of the opposing team.

“WashU has truly exceeded expectations,” said Andrew Shiman, Club President and 3rd B-Team Board of Directors. “A-Team was 16th, and the field had a lot of grandmasters and international masters, so we did a lot better than our rankings suggested.”

The tournament featured 57 total teams from different colleges across the country. The level of competition varied from unrated and novice players to titled players, including 24 chess grandmasters.

“[The competition] was really a mixed bag,” Shiman said. “We played against some pretty decent college teams that had pretty strong tournament players. We played against a team of mostly professional players when the A-Team played against the SLU B-Team. We also played against some teams with a group of very inexperienced players, against whom we did well.

At the end of each round, each player’s individual scores were added together and the cumulative score determined the winner of the round. Due to the team nature of the tournament, the strategy differed from traditional tournaments.

“Most chess tournaments are individual, so you play for yourself and draw or play aggressively for wins depending on your own personal tournament situation,” said Philip Keisler, member of the A-Team. “In a team tournament, the risk you take on the board is much more about how your other boards and other team members are doing, because it’s about winning every game, not necessarily winning. get your personal best score This can lead to different situations during the match which are sometimes a bit more complex.

A-team member Saumik Naraayanan also noted some of the complexities of team play. “You have to pay more attention to your teammates as well as yourself,” he said. “In some scenarios, if you only need a draw to win the game, even if you win, you can just draw to help your team.”

The tournament was held at the Marriott at Washington Dulles Airport. Before each round, pairings were released, allowing teams to prepare for their opponents. Then the teams would play together against their opponents, aiming to have a cumulative positive score.

“The pairings don’t come out until an hour before the round, but usually we can figure out how we’re going to play,” Naraayanan said. “We will determine who is going to play… what color we are going to be, then we prepare all the openings. Usually we can figure out which opening our opponents were going to play by doing research online. Depending on what openings you think they were going to play, we would try to set up our counters, and maybe we would have our own surprise.

Keisler further described some of the team preparation that took place before the rounds that helped individual players conduct their matches better. “[Pre-round], we all go into preparation mode because in chess the first move to really gain an advantage is in the opening if you can outplay your opponent,” Keisler said. “If your opponent is playing the Nimzo-Indian, ‘how can I find a tricky sideline that I know better than them?’ We were all getting ready for each other, so Saumik was helping me out with some lines [and] Nick would go to his computer and look for a bunch of crazy lines that we could sacrifice a bunch of gear on. Then we all went to the board together to start playing our games next to each other.

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Madison City Chess League to host All Girls State Championship – The Madison Record https://tromsosjakklubb.com/madison-city-chess-league-to-host-all-girls-state-championship-the-madison-record/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 01:16:40 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/madison-city-chess-league-to-host-all-girls-state-championship-the-madison-record/ MADISON – Members of the Madison City Chess League are delighted to welcome the 2022 All Girls State Chess Championship to their hometown. The championship tournament location will be Hexagon at 305 Intergraph Way in Madison. The tournament date is February 12. “The last time we were able to organize an extraordinary All Girls State […]]]>

MADISON – Members of the Madison City Chess League are delighted to welcome the 2022 All Girls State Chess Championship to their hometown.

The championship tournament location will be Hexagon at 305 Intergraph Way in Madison. The tournament date is February 12.

“The last time we were able to organize an extraordinary All Girls State was in 2020 at Liberty Middle School. We look forward to welcoming Madison back to a wonderful place – the Hexagon Building, ”said MCCL Executive Director Ranae Bartlett.

State Senator Arthur Orr and Hexagon are sponsoring this tournament.

“Madison has the highest concentration of women playing chess so we’re hoping for another attendance record,” Bartlett said.

The tournament will have three sections: K-3, K-6 and K-12. A school’s top three scores in each section will include the team score.

“The winner of the K-12 section will represent Alabama in the Ruth Haring Women’s National Tournament of Champions,” Bartlett said.

The deadline for early registrations is February 5th. Registration fees will double after this date. Bartlett encourages players to register now.

Time control for Sections K-3 and K-6 will be set 30 / d5 (5SS). Players will compete in rounds at 9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 12:45 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

For section K-12, the time control will be set 45 / d5 (4SS). Rounds for players will start at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

The team score will be the total of the top three individual scores from the same school in each section.

Registration fees are $ 25 until February 5. The fees will then drop to $ 50 until February 9. On-site registration will not be available.

“The Alabama Chess Federation requires that all state championship contestants (including All-Girls and State Scholastic competitions) be current members of the ACF. You can check your membership status on the Alabama Chess Federation web page at alabamachess.org, ”Bartlett said.

For more information on the All Girls tournament, visit madisonchess.com/events/730/2022-all-girls-state-madison. For more information on MCCL, email mccl.director@gmail.com or visit madisonchess.com.

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Chess player who left Iran because of boycott of Israel wins 2021 “Rising Star” award https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-player-who-left-iran-because-of-boycott-of-israel-wins-2021-rising-star-award/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 08:48:56 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-player-who-left-iran-because-of-boycott-of-israel-wins-2021-rising-star-award/ Alireza Firouzja, the 18-year-old chess player who left Iran’s squad in 2019 due to a ban on competing with Israelis, won a top international award. Voters on Chess.com, a web server, news and networking site with 77 million users worldwide, selected him as the “Rising Star” of 2021 and named him second “Player of the […]]]>

Alireza Firouzja, the 18-year-old chess player who left Iran’s squad in 2019 due to a ban on competing with Israelis, won a top international award.

Voters on Chess.com, a web server, news and networking site with 77 million users worldwide, selected him as the “Rising Star” of 2021 and named him second “Player of the Year”. Firouzja’s match against Hungarian grandmaster Richard Rapport was deemed the third best game of 2021.

Magnus Carlsen, the 31-year-old world chess champion, was voted player of the year. In December, Carlsen wrote in a blog post that he was unlikely to play another game to defend his title, except against someone from the ‘next generation’, which meant Firouzja, second in the world rankings. .

Firouzja won the Iranian championship at 12 and was a Grandmaster at 14. He is the second youngest player to ever have reach a rating of 2700, which he did at 16. In December 2019, Firouzja became the first Iranian chess player to finish second at the World Quick Chess Championship in Moscow.

Firouzja renounced his Iranian nationality in 2019 following pressure to lose matches with Israeli competitors, and now participates as a French citizen in international tournaments.

Iran is one of the states that does not recognize the State of Israel, a refusal that dates back to the declaration by the leader of the 1979 revolution, Ruhollah Khomeini, that Iran could have formal relations with any State in the world other than apartheid Israel or South Africa. Tehran prohibits athletes from playing against Israeli competitors or causes them to intentionally lose matches in order to avoid competing with the Israelis.

Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader, has often praised Iranian athletes who refuse to play against Israelis and, in September 2021, said they should continue to do so even if they risk sanctions from the Israeli side. international sports organizations.

In November 2020, International Chess Federation vice-president Nigel Short warned the Iranian Chess Federation that it could be banned from international events if the Iranians were not allowed to compete against the Israelis.

There have been other sporting and cultural boycotts of Israel in recent years. In 2018 Argentinian footballers, including Lionel Messi, refuse to play friendly match in Jerusalem because the land was on the site of a razed Palestinian village. This week over 20 acts withdrawn from the Sydney Festival because of Israeli funding. But the Islamic Republic’s ideological basis for its boycott is much more radical. Iranian officials have often called for the destruction of Israel and are providing arms and money to militant groups.

Among the dozens of Iranian athletes who have emigrated over the past two decades, some have said they did so because officials forced them to lose titles by refusing to compete with the Israelis.

Internationally renowned chess player Ghazal Hakimifard renounced Iranian citizenship in 2020 in protest and is playing for Switzerland.

Some female athletes say they left the national team because of the mandatory hijab (dress code). Grandmaster Mitra Hejazipour was kicked out of the chess team for removing his headscarf during international tournaments.

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Historias de Ajedrez: a Cuban chess film https://tromsosjakklubb.com/historias-de-ajedrez-a-cuban-chess-film/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 11:51:28 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/historias-de-ajedrez-a-cuban-chess-film/ In his film “Historias de Ajedrez”, Cuban filmmaker Emmanuel Martin Hernandez presents three stories exploring life in Cuba. In fact, there are actually four stories. Chess is the unifying element across the different episodes, all of which in one way or another relate to the city of Santiago de Cuba. The protagonist of the first […]]]>


In his film “Historias de Ajedrez”, Cuban filmmaker Emmanuel Martin Hernandez presents three stories exploring life in Cuba. In fact, there are actually four stories. Chess is the unifying element across the different episodes, all of which in one way or another relate to the city of Santiago de Cuba.

The protagonist of the first story is Raul, a chess teacher who loves the game above all else.

He is literally addicted to games, not just chess. However, he struggles to cope with the rest of his life. The film shows him playing flash chess with his friends. This is where he feels at home.

During a phone call, he tries to appease his creditors. That’s when you learn about gambling debts. Her marriage is in shambles. His wife lives with another man. Raul rarely sees their son. Eventually, he even loses his job as a chess coach and has to sleep on the streets. The story ends with Raul beaten because of his gambling debts.

The second story features a female protagonist. Osdalgia Vidaux is a devout Christian, a strong player and a grandmaster competing for the title of national champion.

Winning the title would qualify him for the Chess Olympiad. However, she is also a housewife and mother of young children. The pregnancies had a negative impact on her career. In addition, she also has to take care of her sick mother. Winning the championship would also benefit Osdalgia and his family economically.

Between games, Osdalgia uses her notebook and ChessBase to prepare for the opponents she is about to face.

However, the many sources of stress in her life negatively impact Osdalgia’s performance. Her trainer suggests using the Houdini engine to cheat, which she refuses. While participating in the tournament, Osdalgia’s husband kills his sick mother, played by famous Cuban actress Adela Legra, famous for her role as the protagonist of the Latin American classic “Lucia”. Osdalgia’s husband is played by Jorge Molina (“Juan of the Dead”, 2011).

At her mother’s funeral, Osdalgia states that she came to the conclusion that a good Christian can never be a successful athlete and that it is impossible for a woman to take on both family life and competitive sports.

The third story begins in 1966. Havana hosts the Chess Olympiad. The sporting event is of great importance for the still young Communist Republic. The matches are broadcast on television.

The whole country is obsessed with chess, including Pedro and Pablo, both eleven years old, who gather around a homemade chess board with other street kids, debating the best moves and trying to learn by learning. themselves to play with chess books.

Their love for chess unites Pedro and Pablo throughout their lives. 52 years later, they are both sick. Pedro has difficulty walking, Pablo suffers from diabetes. They still meet regularly to play chess, dressed in T-shirts bearing the effigy of Capablanca or the badge of the Capablanca Memorial.

Pablo’s daughter came from Havana to Santiago to sell her father’s house and take him with her to Havana. When Pablo learns that he is about to lose his chess partner, he offers his daughter money in order to allow his friend to stay in Santiago.

A Voice Off Screen tells a fourth additional story, allegedly an urban internet legend. Unbeknownst to the World Chess Federation and the Russian authorities, Bobby Fischer and Anatoly Karpov reportedly contacted each other by mail in 1975 to organize a game as a private event with a single witness.

Historias de Ajedrez ends with a melancholy final shot.

The writer, director and producer of the film Emmanuel Martin is an expert in chess. A conversation in the film between Grandmaster Osdalgia Vidaux and a chess enthusiast during the Cuban Women’s National Championship mentions a particular episode during the 2008 Chess Olympiad in Dresden, Germany, where the fictional character Osdalgia Vidaux won a major game, which earned him an individual title. silver medal.

In 2008, the real Cuban Grand Master Oleiny Linares Neapel, still WIM at the time, indeed won a silver medal at the Chess Olympics in Dresden: with eight wins and two draws in ten games, she achieved the second best individual performance in table four. . Oleiny Linares Neapel was born in Santiago de Cuba in 1983 and is still a very active and successful player. Could she be the inspiration for the character in the film?

The character of Raul in the first story is a tragic hero, a typical loser, found in large numbers all over the world. Director Emmanuel Martin is a chess player himself, with good connections to the Santiago de Cuba chess community, and no doubt knows players like Raul personally. Their love for the game kept them from growing up. The passion for chess can be a source of joy and friendship for players, but it can also hinder their careers or distort their view of reality. They are artists.

Grandmaster Osdalgia Vidaux, on the other hand, has everything Raul lacks. However, she also cannot find happiness. She’s a successful player with an intact family, but as a woman there’s no way she can handle both things at the same time. The fact that she doesn’t know how her mother died gives her character a particularly tragic note.

The third story is more upbeat in tone. Moving rapidly from 1966 to 2018, he tells of a great and long friendship defined by a mutual interest in chess. And even the bonus story about an alleged secret match between Fischer and Karpov contains elements of reconciliation. Against all limitations and obstacles, in the midst of the Cold War, the best American player and the best Russian player meet to play a game of chess.

And there is another exceptional touch that Emmanuel Martin added to his work. Women feature prominently in all three stories, and the director has managed to include a number of sultry scenes, which don’t feel out of place or gratuitous – a rather rare occurrence in films revolving around chess.

Emmanuel Martin’s “Historias de Ajedrez” was filmed in 2019. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the film and those involved in its creation did not receive the attention their work deserved. The film has been screened at numerous festivals, such as the Callela Film Festival 2020 in Spain, and has won seven awards to date.

In 2022, it could become available on demand on the Vimeo streaming platform.

Trailer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wht9KwqnFRg

Emmanuel Martin Hernandez

The director and his actors

Emmanuel Martin Hernandez learned to play chess as a child and participated in several Cuban youth championships. He then worked as a chess teacher at irregular intervals when he was 24-25 and 31-35, for a total of eight years.

He has published a number of articles on the Grand Masters and International Masters of Santiago de Cuba.

Oleynis, Cristo’s ajedrecista

El Menor, an atípico ajedrecista

For a while, Emmanuel Martin worked as a free journalist. He personally knows and is friends with many chess players, amateur players and club players from his hometown of Santiago de Cuba.

Ajedrez stories, 2019, 79 minutes

Written and directed by Emmanuel Martín Hernandez

Produced by Emmanuel Martín Hernandez

Cast: Adela Legra, Jorge Molina, Neisy Alpizar, Raúl Gomez, Barbara Rodriguez, Laura Ferrer, Yara Gonzalez, Jose Emigdio Pini, Mateos Pazos, Alberto Juantorena, Manuel Enríquez. Most of the actors are artists from several different theater groups from Santiago de Cuba

In Spanish (with English subtitles)

Callela Film Festival …

English translation: Hugo Janz


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