chess championship – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 12:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-16.png chess championship – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ 32 32 Vietnam’s number two chess player enters international best bullet semi-finals https://tromsosjakklubb.com/vietnams-number-two-chess-player-enters-international-best-bullet-semi-finals/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/vietnams-number-two-chess-player-enters-international-best-bullet-semi-finals/ By Xuan Binh March 10, 2022 | 04:30 PT Tuan Minh defeated India’s Raunak Sadhwani on Thursday to advance to the semi-finals of the Bullet Chess Online Championship. Le Tuan Minh at the National Chess Championship in Hanoi, 2020. Photo by VnExpress/Xuan Binh Minh led Sadhwani 4-3 after the first 15 minutes, then scored 4.5 […]]]>

By Xuan Binh March 10, 2022 | 04:30 PT

Tuan Minh defeated India’s Raunak Sadhwani on Thursday to advance to the semi-finals of the Bullet Chess Online Championship.

Le Tuan Minh at the National Chess Championship in Hanoi, 2020. Photo by VnExpress/Xuan Binh

Minh led Sadhwani 4-3 after the first 15 minutes, then scored 4.5 more points over the next six games to lead 8.5-4.5. Overall, Minh won 10-7 to advance.

The Bullet Chess Championship was first organized by chess.com in 2019 with a prize pool of $15,000. It is considered the best chess tournament in the world. In 2022, the prize pool has grown to $100,000. The tournament takes place from February 21 to March 17, starting from the qualifications. Minh has a high Elo rating on bullet on chess.com, so he didn’t have to play the qualifiers.

The main event is a 16-man knockout draw. Four qualified players join 12 invited players to play the main event. Players who lose a match go to the losers pool and if they continue to lose they are eliminated from the event. Grand Finals consist of a maximum of two matches, where a player from the losing pool must win twice to become the champion.

A 30-minute countdown marks the duration of the match, with a break at 15 minutes with no overtime. The highest rated player starts with white in the first game of the match. Players earn 1 point for a win, 0.5 points for a draw, and 0 points for a loss. The player who scores the most points during the match wins.

Minh, 26, is the only non-grandmaster in the semis. With an Elo rating of 2,514, he needs another chess title to become one.

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Ukrainian army of chess players take up arms to subdue Putin’s forces https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 06:33:28 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972. Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is […]]]>

Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972.

Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is more real. They too are facing the Russians, but not overboard.

Ukrainian chess players are resisting Vladimir Putin’s continued invasion of their country. Some have taken up arms to defend their homeland.

Grandmaster and captain of the Ukrainian national team, Oleksander Sulypa, waits behind a trench in the western city of Lviv, holding a rifle to confront the Russian army.

“I defend my land against enemies and ‘peacekeepers’. The truth will prevail!” he posted a week ago.

GM Georgy Timoshenko. Photo: Facebook/ @juliatimoshenko


A day later, another GM Georgy Timoshenko carried a rifle into battle.

“Yura (Georgy) went to defend the capital (Kiev) with guns in hand,” writes his partner Julia.

At 56, Timoshenko is probably the oldest professional chess player to enter this battlefield.

Aspiring Indian players may remember him as an unassuming grandfather coach, who ran chess camps in Odisha, Gujarat and several other Indian cities a few years ago.

GM Natalia Zhukova

GM Natalia Zhukova with Ukrainian fighters in Odessa. Photo: Facebook/ @nataliazhukova


Meanwhile, former European champion Natalia Zhukova proudly attends the city of Odessa in the southeast of the country, where she is now a member of the city council.

“From morning to evening, with like-minded people, we search for all the necessary things, medicines, etc. Zhukova wrote on Facebook.

General Manager Pavel Eljanov reported that General Manager Igor Kovalenko “actively volunteers in Kyiv and helps his brothers who have taken up arms”.

An unshaven and gloomy Kovalenko was last heard asking for help on his YouTube channel.

Eljanov, currently Ukraine’s second-best active player, posted on Facebook that his family was in Khrakiv, an eastern city closer to Russia that was ravaged by the onslaught.

He would be safe somewhere.

Teenage sensation Kirill Shevchenko, from Kyiv, is also hopefully not in danger.

He has been busy on social networks to inform the world of the tragic situation prevailing in his country.

Former world champion Anna Muzychuk has reached out to the chess community, especially her colleagues from Russia and Belarus, asking them to explain their position.

The Ukrainian Chess Federation documented the war from the perspective of its members. The other day he mentioned a war casualty.

“On March 2, 2022, after serious injuries caused by the Russian occupiers, FIDE arbiter and children’s coach Oleksiy Valentynovych Druzhynets died (Tokmak, Zaporizhia Oblast, January 3, 1975 – March 2, 2022),” the report said. federation.

Almost all but one of the Ukrainian players took the cudgel from the Russian attacks in one way or another.

The strange, Super GM Sergey Karjakin has been isolated, not only by Ukrainian players but by the peaceful international chess community as a whole.

What did you write? What do you advocate? asked a shocked Zhukova, after Karjakin rallied to Vladimir Putin.

Karjakin, a former world No. 4, wrote: “I express to you, our Commander-in-Chief, my full support in the interest of Russia, our multinational Russian people, the elimination of threats and the establishment of the peace !”

Ukraine is the country where Karjakin was born, learned to play chess and his family still lives.

After representing his native country throughout his teenage years, Karjakin, now 32, moved to Russia.

He has since become a strong supporter of Putin.

While Karjakin awaits the verdict of the FIDE Ethics Committee, Ukrainian chess players remain on the front line.

Because, as former world champion Garry Kasparov said, condemning the Russian invasion: “It’s not a game of chess. There’s no draw, no stalemate. “

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Chess.com Rapid Chess Championship 2022: all the information https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-com-rapid-chess-championship-2022-all-the-information/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 20:47:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-com-rapid-chess-championship-2022-all-the-information/ the Chess.com Rapid Chess Championship 2022 is a series of world-class online fast-paced events for the world’s top 100 players, top 10 women and top 10 juniors. From February 12 to August 28, these chess stars will be able to participate in weekly Swiss and knockout tournaments to fight for the top of the leaderboard […]]]>

the Chess.com Rapid Chess Championship 2022 is a series of world-class online fast-paced events for the world’s top 100 players, top 10 women and top 10 juniors. From February 12 to August 28, these chess stars will be able to participate in weekly Swiss and knockout tournaments to fight for the top of the leaderboard and their share of the $650,000 prize fund– the largest prize fund in the history of Chess.com.


Broadcast

Make sure you don’t miss a single minute of the action by joining our live stream of the event on Chess.com/TV. You can also enjoy the show on our Twitch channel or access all of our live streams on YouTube.com/ChesscomLive.

Don’t forget to head over to our Events page to follow every detail of the event, including live matches, results, standings and more!

Players

  • The top 100 players, according to the classic FIDE ranking list
  • Top 10 Junior Players
  • Top 10 players

Any player who has been in any of the above categories from January 2021 to the current FIDE list is eligible to play.

The following players have confirmed their intention to participate regularly:

Ranking

To be determined

Program

Players compete in a Swiss tournament every Saturday. The top eight Swiss players qualify for a knockout match on Sunday. These weekend events lead to the finals of the Chess.com Rapid Chess Championship, August 25-28.

Swiss dates Elimination dates Los Angeles New York Paris Bombay
12 February February 13 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 22:30
February 19 February 20 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 22:30
February 26 February 27 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 22:30
March 5 March 6 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 22:30
12th of March March 13 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 22:30
March 19 March 20th 09:00 12:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.* 9:30 p.m.*
March 26 March 27 09:00 12:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.* 9:30 p.m.*
April 2 April 3 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
April 9 April 10 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
April 16 April 17 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
April 23 April 24 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
April 30 May 1 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
May 7 May 8 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
May 14 May 15 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
May 21 May 22 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
May 28 May 29 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
June 4 June 5 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
June 11 June 12 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
Break for candidates
July 9th July 10 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
July 16 July 17 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
July 23 July 24 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
July 30 July 31 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
August 6 August 7 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
August 13 August 14 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
20 August 21st of August 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
Round of 16 Quarter-finals
August 25 August 26 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
Semi-finals Final
August 27 August 28 09:00 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.

* Difference due to summer time

Regular season

  • Swiss events take place on Saturday, knockout events on Sunday
  • Events begin at 9:00 a.m. PT/6:00 p.m. CET
  • February 12-June 12
  • 2022 Candidates Tournament Break: June 13-July 8
  • July 9-August 21

Finals

  • August 25: Round of 16
  • August 26: Quarter-finals
  • August 27: Semi-finals
  • August 28: Final

Format

The 2022 Chess.com Rapid Chess Championship consists of a regular season and finals. The regular season includes Swiss and knockout events every Saturday and Sunday, with players earning Grand Prix points based on their placement on these events. At the end of the regular season, the top 12 players with the most Grand Prix points qualify to join four guest players in the Rapid Chess Championship Finals.

Regular season

Swiss Saturday Events

  • Time control is 10 + 0.
  • Players compete in a nine-round Swiss tournament.
  • The top eight players qualify for this weekend’s knockout tournament.
  • In the event of a tie, the Swiss tournament tiebreakers apply.

Sunday Knockout Events

Finals

To be announced at a later date.

Grand Prize Points

Players accumulate Grand Prix Points throughout the season based on their performance in each weekly event:

  • 1st: 10 points
  • 2nd: 7 points
  • 3rd-4th: 5 points
  • 5th-8th: 3 points
  • 9-16: 2 points
  • 17th-32nd: 1 point

The top 12 players with the most Grand Prix points earn the right to participate in the Rapid Chess Championship Finals.

Price

The prize fund for the event is $650,000, with $500,000 in prize money for weekly Swiss and knockout events and a $150,000 prize pool for Rapid Chess Championship Finals.

Weekly Prize Fund: $20,000

  • 1st: $7,500
  • 2nd: $3,500
  • 3rd: $2,500
  • 4th: $2,500
  • 5th-8th: $1,000

Final Prize Fund: $150,000

  • 1st: $30,000
  • 2nd: $20,000
  • 3rd: $16,000
  • 4th: $12,000
  • 5th-8th: $8,000
  • 9th-16th: $5,000

How to play in the event

Only players on the FIDE Classical Top 100 Rankings list from January 2021 to the current published ranking list are eligible to play in the 2022 Chess.com Rapid Chess Championship. and the top 10 juniors by classic ranking from January 2021 to the current published ranking list.

Any qualified player who has a Preferred Account that is not yet added to the Official Club must contact titled@chess.com to be added to the Official Club.

Identification requirements and fair play

  • All accounts must be labeled with the player’s real name.
  • All players will be required to participate in a Zoom call for all Swiss events
  • Players must have a dual camera setup for knockout events.
  • Players must have the ability to share their screen on demand.
  • Players are allowed to broadcast the event with a chat emote only.
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Madison City Chess League to host All Girls State Championship – The Madison Record https://tromsosjakklubb.com/madison-city-chess-league-to-host-all-girls-state-championship-the-madison-record/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 01:16:40 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/madison-city-chess-league-to-host-all-girls-state-championship-the-madison-record/ MADISON – Members of the Madison City Chess League are delighted to welcome the 2022 All Girls State Chess Championship to their hometown. The championship tournament location will be Hexagon at 305 Intergraph Way in Madison. The tournament date is February 12. “The last time we were able to organize an extraordinary All Girls State […]]]>

MADISON – Members of the Madison City Chess League are delighted to welcome the 2022 All Girls State Chess Championship to their hometown.

The championship tournament location will be Hexagon at 305 Intergraph Way in Madison. The tournament date is February 12.

“The last time we were able to organize an extraordinary All Girls State was in 2020 at Liberty Middle School. We look forward to welcoming Madison back to a wonderful place – the Hexagon Building, ”said MCCL Executive Director Ranae Bartlett.

State Senator Arthur Orr and Hexagon are sponsoring this tournament.

“Madison has the highest concentration of women playing chess so we’re hoping for another attendance record,” Bartlett said.

The tournament will have three sections: K-3, K-6 and K-12. A school’s top three scores in each section will include the team score.

“The winner of the K-12 section will represent Alabama in the Ruth Haring Women’s National Tournament of Champions,” Bartlett said.

The deadline for early registrations is February 5th. Registration fees will double after this date. Bartlett encourages players to register now.

Time control for Sections K-3 and K-6 will be set 30 / d5 (5SS). Players will compete in rounds at 9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 12:45 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

For section K-12, the time control will be set 45 / d5 (4SS). Rounds for players will start at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

The team score will be the total of the top three individual scores from the same school in each section.

Registration fees are $ 25 until February 5. The fees will then drop to $ 50 until February 9. On-site registration will not be available.

“The Alabama Chess Federation requires that all state championship contestants (including All-Girls and State Scholastic competitions) be current members of the ACF. You can check your membership status on the Alabama Chess Federation web page at alabamachess.org, ”Bartlett said.

For more information on the All Girls tournament, visit madisonchess.com/events/730/2022-all-girls-state-madison. For more information on MCCL, email mccl.director@gmail.com or visit madisonchess.com.

]]> Chess player who left Iran because of boycott of Israel wins 2021 “Rising Star” award https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-player-who-left-iran-because-of-boycott-of-israel-wins-2021-rising-star-award/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 08:48:56 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-player-who-left-iran-because-of-boycott-of-israel-wins-2021-rising-star-award/ Alireza Firouzja, the 18-year-old chess player who left Iran’s squad in 2019 due to a ban on competing with Israelis, won a top international award. Voters on Chess.com, a web server, news and networking site with 77 million users worldwide, selected him as the “Rising Star” of 2021 and named him second “Player of the […]]]>

Alireza Firouzja, the 18-year-old chess player who left Iran’s squad in 2019 due to a ban on competing with Israelis, won a top international award.

Voters on Chess.com, a web server, news and networking site with 77 million users worldwide, selected him as the “Rising Star” of 2021 and named him second “Player of the Year”. Firouzja’s match against Hungarian grandmaster Richard Rapport was deemed the third best game of 2021.

Magnus Carlsen, the 31-year-old world chess champion, was voted player of the year. In December, Carlsen wrote in a blog post that he was unlikely to play another game to defend his title, except against someone from the ‘next generation’, which meant Firouzja, second in the world rankings. .

Firouzja won the Iranian championship at 12 and was a Grandmaster at 14. He is the second youngest player to ever have reach a rating of 2700, which he did at 16. In December 2019, Firouzja became the first Iranian chess player to finish second at the World Quick Chess Championship in Moscow.

Firouzja renounced his Iranian nationality in 2019 following pressure to lose matches with Israeli competitors, and now participates as a French citizen in international tournaments.

Iran is one of the states that does not recognize the State of Israel, a refusal that dates back to the declaration by the leader of the 1979 revolution, Ruhollah Khomeini, that Iran could have formal relations with any State in the world other than apartheid Israel or South Africa. Tehran prohibits athletes from playing against Israeli competitors or causes them to intentionally lose matches in order to avoid competing with the Israelis.

Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader, has often praised Iranian athletes who refuse to play against Israelis and, in September 2021, said they should continue to do so even if they risk sanctions from the Israeli side. international sports organizations.

In November 2020, International Chess Federation vice-president Nigel Short warned the Iranian Chess Federation that it could be banned from international events if the Iranians were not allowed to compete against the Israelis.

There have been other sporting and cultural boycotts of Israel in recent years. In 2018 Argentinian footballers, including Lionel Messi, refuse to play friendly match in Jerusalem because the land was on the site of a razed Palestinian village. This week over 20 acts withdrawn from the Sydney Festival because of Israeli funding. But the Islamic Republic’s ideological basis for its boycott is much more radical. Iranian officials have often called for the destruction of Israel and are providing arms and money to militant groups.

Among the dozens of Iranian athletes who have emigrated over the past two decades, some have said they did so because officials forced them to lose titles by refusing to compete with the Israelis.

Internationally renowned chess player Ghazal Hakimifard renounced Iranian citizenship in 2020 in protest and is playing for Switzerland.

Some female athletes say they left the national team because of the mandatory hijab (dress code). Grandmaster Mitra Hejazipour was kicked out of the chess team for removing his headscarf during international tournaments.

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The Candidates Tournament will take place in June 2022 in Madrid, sponsored by Chess.com https://tromsosjakklubb.com/the-candidates-tournament-will-take-place-in-june-2022-in-madrid-sponsored-by-chess-com/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 13:33:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/the-candidates-tournament-will-take-place-in-june-2022-in-madrid-sponsored-by-chess-com/ Palo Alto, Calif., December 28, 2021 — The 2022 Candidates Tournament, which will produce the challenger for the next World Chess Championship match, will take place in June 2022 in Madrid, Spain. As the organizing sponsor of this prestigious tournament, Chess.com signed an agreement on Monday with the governing body FIDE and the Scheinberg family, […]]]>


Palo Alto, Calif., December 28, 2021 — The 2022 Candidates Tournament, which will produce the challenger for the next World Chess Championship match, will take place in June 2022 in Madrid, Spain. As the organizing sponsor of this prestigious tournament, Chess.com signed an agreement on Monday with the governing body FIDE and the Scheinberg family, sponsor of the event.

The Candidates Tournament will again be the most important tournament of the year, with eight top-level Grandmasters vying for a place in the next title match. The previous Candidates Tournament, which was held in Yekaterinburg, Russia, partly in 2020 and partly in 2021 due to the Covid-19 pandemic, was one of the most watched tournaments in history failures.

So far, six players have qualified for the 2022 edition: general managers Fabiano Caruana, Jan-Krzysztof Duda, Alireza Firouzja, Sergey Karjakin, Ian Nepomniachtchi and Teimour Radjabov. The last two players will come from the 2022 FIDE Grand Prix, which will be held from February to April 2022.

Following the agreement between FIDE, the Scheinberg family and Chess.com, the dates and the host city of the next Candidates Tournament have been fixed. The tournament is scheduled to take place from June 16 to July 7, 2022 in Madrid. The location of the game room has not yet been announced, but it is already known that the opening and closing ceremonies will take place at the luxury Four Seasons hotel in the Spanish capital.

“The Candidates Tournament is one of the most exciting events on the chess calendar, and as such it has a huge following. Its popularity has grown to the point that it is comparable to that of the world championship, ”said FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich. .

“For FIDE, it is a great satisfaction to organize this important tournament in Spain, a country that loves chess. The partnership with Chess.com will also allow us to organize this event at the highest level, as it was the case recently at FIDE Chess.com Grand Swiss in Riga. Last but not least, I would like to thank the Scheinberg family, whose constant contribution to chess deserves real appreciation. “

“For the Spanish Chess Federation, it will be a great honor to cooperate with FIDE and Chess.com to make this event possible,” said the President of the Spanish Chess Federation, Javier Ochoa de Echagüen. “Chess has always been very popular in our country and highly respected as an educational tool, with hundreds of thousands of children engaged in chess activities in schools. Organize a leading sporting event like the Candidates attracts media attention and gives all of these kids something to admire. “

“I am very happy to be working with FIDE and the Scheinberg family on this event,” said Erik Allebest, CEO of Chess.com. “As a fan, I am already looking forward to following this incredible tournament and I am looking forward to the result. I am also happy that these incredible players have the opportunity to play in such a wonderful city and what will surely be a great place. “

The tournament is made possible by the generous sponsorship of the Scheinberg family, who have declared themselves honored to once again contribute to a major chess event that is part of the world championship cycle. Chess.com will provide additional support as a co-host and official broadcast partner, again featuring exclusive images of the game room on Twitch.

The 2020-2021 FIDE candidates in Yekaterinburg, Russia. Photo: Maria Emelianova / Chess.com.

The tradition of chess in Spain goes back several centuries. The rules of chess as we know them today were established in Spain at the end of the 15th century, when the Catholic priest Ruy Lopez de Segura (circa 1530 – circa 1580) was considered the most important player. strong of the world. All major chess events have taken place in Spain at least once, including among others the 1987 Kasparov-Karpov World Championship in Seville, the Susan Polgar-Xie Jun Women’s World Championship match in Jaen in 1996 and the ‘Chess Olympiad in Calvia in 2004.

Spain have also hosted the candidates’ final twice previously. In 1987 GM Anatoly Karpov qualified for his Sevilla match by beating GM Andrei Sokolov at Linares, and the 1993 FIDE Candidates Final between GM Nigel Short and GM Jan Timman was held in El Escorial, around 45 kilometers (28 miles) northwest of Madrid. The Magistral Comunidad de Madrid 1998, won by GM Viswanathan Anand, was the last major chess tournament in the Spanish capital.

The Candidates Tournament itself also has a long tradition. It was first held in 1950 in Budapest and the second edition, the 1953 Candidates’ Tournament in Zurich, is one of the most famous tournaments in chess history.

In modern times, the 2013 London Candidates Tournament has been particularly dramatic and historic, when current GM World Champion Magnus Carlsen managed to qualify for his first World Championship. He beat Anand later that year and successfully defended his title in 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2021.

Recently, Carlsen said he wants to defend his title only if his opponent is from the new generation of chess players. His favorite opponent is 18-year-old Firouzja, who recently reached second in the world behind Carlsen as the youngest player to cross the 2800 Elo margin.

About FIDE:

Founded in 1924, the International Chess Federation (FIDE) is the governing body of the sport of chess and regulates all international chess competitions. Established as a non-governmental institution, it was recognized by the International Olympic Committee as a world sports organization in 1999. Based in Lausanne, it is one of the largest sports organizations, comprising 195 countries as a affiliated members, in the form of National Chess Federations.

About Chess.com:

Chess.com is the world’s largest chess site, with a community of over 77 million members around the world playing millions of games every day. Launched in 2007, Chess.com is the leader in chess news, lessons, events and shows. Visit Chess.com to play, learn and connect with chess, the world’s most popular game.

Contact:

FIDE:
press@fide.com

Chess.com:

press@chess.com


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Chess: the 5th Kireka Open in Namugongo https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-the-5th-kireka-open-in-namugongo/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 19:10:27 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-the-5th-kireka-open-in-namugongo/ The 5th edition of the highly anticipated Kireka Open-rated Chess Championship will be in the spotlight from Tuesday December 28 to Friday December 31, 2021 at Gloria Gardens located in Namugongo after the Catholic Martyrs Shrine in Kampala. More than 200 players are expected to compete in the championship which is the Ugandan Chess Federation […]]]>


The 5th edition of the highly anticipated Kireka Open-rated Chess Championship will be in the spotlight from Tuesday December 28 to Friday December 31, 2021 at Gloria Gardens located in Namugongo after the Catholic Martyrs Shrine in Kampala.

More than 200 players are expected to compete in the championship which is the Ugandan Chess Federation (UCF) Grandprix Circuit’s second qualifying tournament for the 2022 Russia Chess Olympiad and other international events.

Organized by the Kireka Chess Club, winner of the Premier Bet Uganda Chess League 2019, the second Grand Prix qualifying tournament for the 2022 Olympiad in Khanty, Mansiysk follows the previous Rwabushenyi Memorial Open which took place in Kiwatule.

The 2021 edition is open to all players with a FIDE ID and will take place under the Swiss twinning system over a total of 8 rounds. The event will be held in a single section but will offer prizes to open and female participants, seniors, Brilliant and U1600 rated players.

The 5th Open Kireka will also include the unranked junior section which will be played for 2 days (Thursday and Friday), each day comprising 3 rounds, with a time check of 1 hour per player from the first shot.

The total number of laps will be 6 laps and the participants in this section will receive participation certificates while the top 3 in each category for boys and girls will receive medals.

The unranked junior section will have age categories of U10, U12, U14, U16 and U18.

Other Grand Prize events include; Kantinti Memorial Chess Championship (February 2022), Zabassajja Memorial Open Chess Championship (March 2022) and Uganda Open Chess Championship (April 2022).

At the culmination of the five qualifying rounds, a roster of 24 players (12 men and 12 women) will be selected based on the final standings of the UCF Grand Prix circuit, including one junior champion and one wild card entry to participate in the championship. national. Moscow 2022 qualifying final phase.

The selection will be made on the basis of the best three events performed out of the five. Players will then proceed to a single round robin which will determine the top 5 open and female players who will form the 2022 Uganda Olympiad 10-player squad.

International Master (IM) Arthur Segwanyi won the 2019 championship and the inaugural championship in 2016. While the Fide Master Harold Wanyama (2017) and Solomon Lubega (2018) won the other editions.

5th Kireka open price structure

Open category

• Winner – UGX. 100,000
• Second – UGX 700,000
• Third – UGX 450000
• Fourth – 200,000 UGX
• Fifth – UGX 100,000

Ladies Category

• Winner – UGX 700,000
• Finalist – UGX 350000
• Second finalist – UGX 150,000
• Fourth – UGX 100,000

Best senior (50 years +) – UGX 100,000
Brilliant Player – UGX 100,000
Ranking U1600 – UGX 100,000

Rules, regulations and tie-breaking systems

• The tournament is open to all players with a FIDE ID and will take place under the Swiss twinning system over a total of 8 rounds. The tournament will be played in a single section but will offer prizes to open and female participants.

• A maximum of 150 players will be accommodated with preference given to
players who already have a FIDE ID and URS â„¢ rating. Local unranked players who wish to obtain an official FIDE and URS â„¢ rating are encouraged to register as early as possible to avoid disappointment.

• Players who do not have an official FIDE ID should ask their local chess federation to create one for them before the start of the tournament.

• The time control for all games is 90 minutes plus 30 minutes with an increment of 30 seconds per move from move 1.

• No drawing offer will be allowed until Black has completed their 30th move.

• Downtime control should be applied.

• Any player giving a pass without any justification will be required to pay a fine of
50,000 / -, so advise the referee to omit your name from the pairing list if you intend to miss a round in order to avoid penalties.

Kireka Open previous winners

• MI Ssegwanyi Arthur – 2019
• Lubega Salomon – 2018
• FM Wanyama Harold – 2017
• MI Ssegwanyi Arthur 2016


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WGM Frayna crowned female chess champion PH https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wgm-frayna-crowned-female-chess-champion-ph/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 12:30:22 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wgm-frayna-crowned-female-chess-champion-ph/ Grandmaster female Janelle Mae Frayna set back Shania Mae Mendoza in the 11th and final round to crown herself queen of the 2021 Philippine Women’s National Chess Championship at the PACE building in Quezon City on Thursday night. Janelle Mae Frayna The number one seed Frayna dominated second Mendoza in the opener to snatch a […]]]>


Grandmaster female Janelle Mae Frayna set back Shania Mae Mendoza in the 11th and final round to crown herself queen of the 2021 Philippine Women’s National Chess Championship at the PACE building in Quezon City on Thursday night.

Janelle Mae Frayna

The number one seed Frayna dominated second Mendoza in the opener to snatch a pawn, seal victory and claim her third women’s national title after reigning supreme in 2013 and 2016.

“It’s been a while since I won here because I have focused on men’s competition for the last few years,” said Frayna, 24. “It was a tough field and I’m glad I won.”

But the impressive performance was not without a hitch, as Frayna had to overcome a first-round loss to 13-year-old prodigy Ruelle Canino.

The defeat proved to be a blessing in disguise as it started a fire inside Frayna, who scored 7.5 points, highlighted by six wins since then to run away with the Championship, the best purse in the world. ‘worth 50,000 P and a seat for the Southeast Asian Games in Hanoi. in May of next year.

“She (Canino) is a good player and could be the future of Filipino chess. She beat me, no apologies, ”Frayna said. “It was a wake-up call for me and I decided to aim for victory in every game.”

Frayna ended up finishing one point ahead of eventual finalist Kylen Joy Mordido, who is a third and final result of following in the footsteps of the first as the country’s second WGM.

19-year-old Mordido halved the point with Cebu proud Marian Calimbo in 34 strokes from an England opening.

The Dasmarinas bet, Cavite went for the win and, in fact, grabbed a slight positional advantage.
But Mordido saw Frayna make the deal, which made it questionable for her to just draw.

Mendoza slid to join third place with third choice Jan Jodilyn Fronda, who shared the point with Marie-Antoinette San Diego, with six points apiece, but clinched third place in a tiebreaker.

The rest of the standings were completed by San Diego, Bernadette Galas, Rinoa Mariel Sadey, Allaney Jia Doroy, Canino, Lexie Grace Hernandez and Calimbo.

The event was supported by PSC President Butch Ramirez, Chess Movement, Inc. President, Dr Ariel Potot, PCSO Executive Director Royina Garma, Founder of Endgame Sports Atty. Cris Aspiras, President of POC Bambol Tolentino, Chief of NCFP Butch Pichay, Atty. Roel Canobas and Barkadahan Para sa Bansa are on the list of candidates Petchi Ragos and Atty. Juman Paa.


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Speed ​​chess championship: Nakamura defeats Ding in spectacular Armageddon finish and advances to final https://tromsosjakklubb.com/speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bchess-championship-nakamura-defeats-ding-in-spectacular-armageddon-finish-and-advances-to-final/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 08:40:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bchess-championship-nakamura-defeats-ding-in-spectacular-armageddon-finish-and-advances-to-final/ In the final semifinal match of the 2021 Speed ​​Chess Championship Main Event, GM Hikaru Nakamura defeated GM Ding Liren in the climactic Armageddon match after an unforgettable, two-way, and epic four-hour fight. . The five-time United States champion and number one seed will face GM Wesley So in the final game on Sunday December […]]]>


In the final semifinal match of the 2021 Speed ​​Chess Championship Main Event, GM Hikaru Nakamura defeated GM Ding Liren in the climactic Armageddon match after an unforgettable, two-way, and epic four-hour fight. . The five-time United States champion and number one seed will face GM Wesley So in the final game on Sunday December 19 at 10:00 a.m. PT / 7:00 p.m. CET.

The resilience of the American grandmaster, his ability to retaliate despite unfavorable match situations, was a recurring theme in this heartbreaking match. Winning on demand in the final ball game to send the match into tie-breaks, then pulling the final game of tie-breaks into a precarious position and sending the game into Armageddon, and ultimately winning the final game with the black pieces , Nakamura proved that even when he was knocked down, he never got out.

How to look?

The games of the 2021 Speed ​​Chess Championship Main Event are played on the Chess.com live server. They are also available on our platform to watch live matches at Chess.com/events and on our apps under “Watch”. Expert comments can be enjoyed at Chess.com/tv.

Live broadcast of the match.

While no one could predict exactly how this intense match would unfold, there were some pre-match predictions that were oddly accurate. While Ding has dominated Nakamura on several occasions in the late opening or mid-game stages, he has been unable to convert a full point in several key games.

Chess overview

As a result, GM commentator Daniel Naroditsky reiterated a sentiment we’ve heard many times before: “It doesn’t matter how much you win. [against Nakamura]- it really isn’t! ”Nakamura, true to his style, apparently found all the resources available to keep fighting and Ding failed to win many finals in this match.

Blitz 5 + 1: Nakamura-Ding 5-4:

The five-minute portion was perhaps the least dramatic, but also the most precise. During the second match, IM commentator David Pruess observed: “He’s giving me, so far, classic chess vibes in this blitz match … would pretty much sum up the first part of the match.

The two players played a fairly consistent repertoire. Nakamura opted for symmetrical Grunfeld or double fianchetto systems like White. Meanwhile, Ding has played a Catalan in every white game in this section except the fourth game, where we saw a Nimzo-Indian, an opening he didn’t repeat for the rest of the game.

Looking back, the critical moments when Ding failed to convert a decisive advantage, and in some cases even lost, really hurt his chances. Watch how Nakamura quickly grabs a single chance given to him:

Blitz 3 + 1: Nakamura-Ding 4-6:

Due to Nakamura’s renowned strength in the ball segment, many of his opponents lean to gain an advantage in blitz sections and have a lead to fall back on later in ball games. Ding certainly accomplished this by scoring more points in the 3 + 1 portion, but his advantage could have been greater had he not missed some important opportunities, especially in Matches 5 and 10 of this segment.

After the first match, another Catalan, Pruess, observed: “No one has yet touched their electronic pawn with White before the 10th move in this match!

After three draws, Ding convincingly won as Black in Game 4. He really should have won the next game, having played Queen’s Gambit Declined (QGD) with 5.Bf4, but couldn’t put the game aside in the scramble that followed.

Then Ding, after winning as Black in the sixth game, won again as White in the next game, in a HQ with 5.Bf4 again, in one of the best games of the match, and in just 24 moves:

Nakamura won the next match, drew the next and opened a new opening for the first time as White – Ruy Lopez – after which he saved a critical pawn knight ending in the game’s last match. 3 + 1.

At the end of the blitz sections, Ding was leading by one point with an aggregate score of 10-9. For most players, this margin is often not enough to keep the US GM in the bullet segment. But who would have known what to expect?

Chip 1 + 1: Nakamura-Ding 4.5-3.5:

This part of the game was by far the most exciting before the tiebreakers and Armageddon. In a feat few in the world can claim, Chinese GM has stood up to the American in the very segment where it is most feared.

The first surprise was when Ding won the first game. He had a somewhat precarious conversion in a four-knight final, but the victory never slipped.

The next three games were all decided by Whites’ victories, oddly enough, as the players each traded proverbial punches. But then Nakamura won for the second time in a row in Game 5, this time as Black, in an opposing colored bishop midfield. This is usually the time when, once he gains momentum, Nakamura can run away with the ball segment with a few winks.

But then Ding also won as Black! After a draw in the next game, Ding suddenly only needed a draw to win it all. Entering the last match of the 1 + 1 portion in an unavoidable situation, Nakamura scored a sensational victory:

The score was 13.5-13.5, and the match was sent to tie-breaks! Interestingly, in the post-match interview, Ding later admitted that he didn’t realize that a draw here would have ensured the game’s entire victory!

Tie-breaking: Nakamura-Ding 2-2:

Tensions were high because Ding had apparently done the impossible; he competed with Nakamura in the balls segment (and almost won it too!). Now all three outcomes were possible.

Nakamura won the first game as Black in his usual style of playing fast and causing problems for the opponent with every stroke. The next match, an Italian, ended peacefully in a draw.

Ding, in an inescapable situation now, also delivered a victory on demand! He built an impressive attack which resulted in the following amazing combination.

In the final tie-break, a victory for either player would have won the entire match. Just as Ding seemed to have real pressure, but with no obvious plan and with less than 20 seconds remaining, he nodded to a triple repetition of movements.

Armageddon: Nakamura-Ding 1-0:

In the end, a game of Armageddon, the tiebreaker of all tiebreakers, decided the outcome of the game. Ding had the white pieces and five minutes against Nakamura’s four, with no increase this time. As compensation for the extra minute, the US GM had draw odds, meaning he only needed to draw as Black in the final game to win.

As Ding built up significant pressure in the middle of the game, he tragically missed a rally on move 16 and, although he still had compensation, was unable to convert his position to a full point.

In the post-match interview, both players shared compelling ideas and opinions.

Asked by Naroditsky about how he recovered mentally in times of crisis, Nakamura replied, “Yes, I mean, I think the main thing is to keep going, to believe in yourself …” After comparing this match to his with GM Alireza Firouzja in the Bullet Chess Championship earlier this year, he added, “You’re just trying to hang in there, trying to believe that good things are going to happen. But it was obviously a very difficult game and a lot of credit goes to Ding for having so well done. “

Asked by Pruess if he expected the match to be as close as it was, Ding replied, “Of course I didn’t prepare. [for] a tie-break … Today’s match was very tense … I had more better positions than Hikaru, but he defended well and sometimes he played very, very fast in very complicated positions. It’s his skills. “

When asked for his thoughts on playing Wesley So in the final, Nakamura said: “I mean, I don’t know; I have to say, of all the Speed ​​Chess Championship games … I thought it was the toughest game I “had played – and that includes the game I lost to Magnus, by the way. Obviously Ding couldn’t convert to the same degree as Magnus, but after today’s game I’m just going to try to play chess well and hope good things happen. Today was an epic match and it was a lot of fun to play. “

… I thought it was the toughest game I had played — and that includes the game I lost to Magnus, by the way.
—Hikaru Nakamura

All the games

Ranking

Naka chess final

The 2021 Speed ​​Chess Championship Main Event is a knockout tournament between 16 of the best Grandmasters in the world who will play for a prize of $ 100,000. The tournament will run from November 8 to December 19, 2021 on Chess.com. Each individual match will consist of 90 minutes of 5 + 1 blitz, 60 minutes of 3 + 1 blitz and 30 minutes of 1 + 1 bullet.

Find all the information on the Speed ​​Chess Championship here.


Previous reports:

  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: So Edges Out Nihal, enters final
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: So Knocks Out Caruana, move to SF
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: Nakamura defeats Giri and will face Ding in SF
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: Ding eliminates Aronian and advances to semi-finals
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: Nihal dominates against Rapport, advances to SF
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: Caruana surprises MVL and finds herself in the quarter-finals
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: then rally, eliminate Xiong
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: Nakamura dominates at Bullet, qualifies for quarter-finals
  • Speed ​​Chess Championship: Nihal and Aronian win and advance to quarter-finals
  • Speed ​​chess championship: Report knockout Sarana in dramatic tiebreaker
  • Speed ​​chess championship: Ding beats Mamedyarov, finishing tight to reach QF
  • Speed ​​chess championship: Giri beats Duda and advances to quarter-finals



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BREAKDOWN: Carlsen wins World Chess Championship after Nepo blunder again https://tromsosjakklubb.com/breakdown-carlsen-wins-world-chess-championship-after-nepo-blunder-again/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 15:54:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/breakdown-carlsen-wins-world-chess-championship-after-nepo-blunder-again/ GM Magnus Carlsen won the 2021 FIDE World Chess Championship on Friday after beating GM Ian Nepomniachtchi with the black pieces. The challenger made another big blunder and ultimately lost his fourth game, fixing the final score at 7.5-3.5 in favor of Carlsen. Chess.com’s full report on the game with photos, quotes and analysis from […]]]>


GM Magnus Carlsen won the 2021 FIDE World Chess Championship on Friday after beating GM Ian Nepomniachtchi with the black pieces. The challenger made another big blunder and ultimately lost his fourth game, fixing the final score at 7.5-3.5 in favor of Carlsen.

Chess.com’s full report on the game with photos, quotes and analysis from General Manager Sam Shankland will be released shortly.

How to watch the 2021 FIDE World Championship post-match show

The 2021 FIDE World Chess Championship post-match show is currently LIVE on Chess.com/TV and on our Twitch and YouTube channels. You can also follow all the details here on our live events platform.

Final score

fed Last name Rtg 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 ten 11 12 13 14 Goal
Magnus carlsen 2855 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 . . . 7½
Ian nepomniachtchi 2782 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 . . . 4½

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Previous coverage:


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